Purebred registry – Codogfederation http://codogfederation.org/ Mon, 09 May 2022 01:32:40 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://codogfederation.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-71-120x120.png Purebred registry – Codogfederation http://codogfederation.org/ 32 32 A shocking message to owners of Wisconsin’s fire hydrant dog https://codogfederation.org/a-shocking-message-to-owners-of-wisconsins-fire-hydrant-dog/ Fri, 06 May 2022 16:50:14 +0000 https://codogfederation.org/a-shocking-message-to-owners-of-wisconsins-fire-hydrant-dog/ These photos posted by Kylie Rose Engelhardt on Facebook nearly broke the internet and millions of hearts earlier this week, but they also taught us why we should never judge a book by its cover. When I first saw these photos, I got slightly furious. I understand that people go through tough times and have […]]]>

These photos posted by Kylie Rose Engelhardt on Facebook nearly broke the internet and millions of hearts earlier this week, but they also taught us why we should never judge a book by its cover.

When I first saw these photos, I got slightly furious. I understand that people go through tough times and have no choice but to abandon their pet when they can no longer care for it, but why tie it to a fire hydrant? Can’t they find a way to get him to an animal shelter and get him back safely?!? Yes, most animal shelters charge a fee for delivering your pet, but most of them will work with someone who just can’t afford it.

The only thing that kept me from starting to spit fire seeing an abandoned dog tied to a fire hydrant was the fact that the owner(s) left a backpack full of toys, food, treats and a note as well. To me, it shows that they care about their “Baby Girl” and really want her to find the loving home she deserves.

Wisconsin Humane Society response to owners of baby girls

After taking care of Baby Girl, the Green Bay Campus of the Wisconsin Humane Society shared a heartwarming update and a special message for the dog’s former owners on Facebook. The part that really hit me hard in the sensations was this;

First off, we’re sorry you had to part ways with your best friend. It’s obvious how much you loved him and we can see that you did your best while battling your own medical complications and life challenges. We see your love in the bag you carefully packed with all of his favorite things. We see your love in the way you tied her leash so she wouldn’t get run over by a car. We see your love in the way you placed her in the middle of a neighborhood where she would quickly be found. We see your love in Baby Girl’s happy and healthy appearance. And we see your love in the note you left, pleading for someone to help you when you couldn’t.

If the Humane Society isn’t crazy about how Baby Girl was delivered, how can we be?

Baby Girl is still in mandatory wandering confinement at the Wisconsin Humane Society in Green Bay, but she will soon be ready to find her new forever home. If you are interested in adopting Baby Girl, visit wihumane.org.

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Keep watching: Find out what 50 of America’s most popular dog breeds look like as puppies.

Check out these 50 fascinating facts about dogs:

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DOGS READY TO TAKE BACK DALLAS WITH AKC MEET THE BREEDS® | News https://codogfederation.org/dogs-ready-to-take-back-dallas-with-akc-meet-the-breeds-news/ Thu, 05 May 2022 14:20:10 +0000 https://codogfederation.org/dogs-ready-to-take-back-dallas-with-akc-meet-the-breeds-news/ – Tickets on sale now for the biggest pet event in town – NEW YORK, May 5, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Tickets are on sale NOW for Dallas’ first AKC Meet the Breeds®arriving at the Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center Saturday June 25and Sunday, June 26, 2022. The American Kennel Club® (AKC) and GF Sports & […]]]>

– Tickets on sale now for the biggest pet event in town –

NEW YORK, May 5, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Tickets are on sale NOW for Dallas’ first AKC Meet the Breeds®arriving at the Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center Saturday June 25and Sunday, June 26, 2022. The American Kennel Club® (AKC) and GF Sports & Entertainment are hosting this two-day educational event to dallas to give attendees the unique opportunity to meet and play with a variety of different dog breeds while learning about responsible pet ownership and how to find the best breed(s) for their lifestyle directly from the experts . From Affenpinschers to Yorkshire Terriers, this canine extravaganza is fun for the whole family.

Participants can:

  • Meet and Play with tons of different dog breeds in stalls that describe each breed’s country of origin, historical purpose/function
  • Discover new breeds and talk to breed experts to determine which dog will suit their lifestyle
  • To learn about responsible pet ownership
  • To see fun and entertaining demonstrations of dog sports and working dogs showing off their skills
  • Engage in unique activities such as testing your agility skills in our interactive fun zone. Participants can also take part in games and photo ops with the whole family.

The event is open to the general public and is perfect for the whole family. Admission is $20 for children and $30 for adults. Upgraded VIP entry is also available. The tickets are on sale now through the tour’s exclusive ticket provider SeatGeek®. Use promo code MEET for 20% off all general admission tickets.

“We are delighted to organize this event dallas“, said the executive secretary of the AKC Gina DiNardo. “dallas is known for its dog shows, and we’re thrilled to introduce such a dog-friendly city to this unique event where they can see their favorite breeds and discover new ones.”

Not only will you be able to meet and play with many different breeds of dogs, but there will also be exciting demonstrations that showcase the dogs’ athleticism and work ethic, including:

  • Agility – Watch these super talented dogs navigate an obstacle course of jumps, weaves and tunnels courtesy of the Dallas Agility Working Group.
  • Obedience – Experience the precision work of competitive obedience dogs as they heel, retrieve and demonstrate how dogs can progress from basic to next-level skills presented by the Dog Training Club of Dallas County.
  • disc dog – Enjoy this fast and fun sport that takes fetch play to a whole new level, brought to you by Cat City Disc Dogs.
  • Rally – Experience this thrilling sport that’s both skill and thrill as dogs and their owners navigate a course of obedience tasks courtesy of the Dog Training Club of Tampa.
  • Perfume work – The nose knows! See dogs use their natural abilities to locate a scent and communicate to their handler that it has been found, presented by the Dog Training Club of Dallas County.

For images from our previous Meet The Breeds event held at San Diego, CaliforniaClick on here.

For more information and to purchase tickets, visit our website here.

About the American Kennel Club

Founded in 1884, the American Kennel Club is a nonprofit organization that maintains the world’s largest purebred dog registry and oversees the sport of purebred dogs in United States. The AKC is dedicated to maintaining the integrity of its registry, promoting the sport of purebred dogs, and breeding for type and function. With its more than 5,000 chartered and member clubs and affiliated organizations, the AKC champions the purebred dog as a family companion, advances canine health and welfare, strives to protect the rights of all dog owners and promotes responsible dog ownership. More than 22,000 competitions for AKC-registered purebred and mixed breed dogs are held each year under AKC rules and regulations, including conformation, agility, obedience, rallying, tracking , herding, lure racing, coonhound events, hunt tests, field and land dog tests. Organizations affiliated with the AKC include the AKC Humane Fund, AKC Canine Health Foundation, AKC Reunite, and AKC Museum of the Dog. AKC clubs comprise America’s largest lifesaving network. For more information, visit www.akc.org.

AKC, American Kennel Club, the American Kennel Club seal and design, and all related marks and logos are trademarks, registered trademarks, and service marks of American Kennel Club, Inc.

Become a fan of the American Kennel Club on Facebook and follow us on Twitter @AKCDogLovers

About GF Sports & Entertainment

GF Sports & Entertainment is a global events and operations company that enhances the experience of live sports, entertainment and interactive events. The company owns two of ATP The oldest American tennis tournaments on the circuit, the Dallas Open and the Truist Atlanta Open, as well as the National Lacrosse League New York Riptide. In partnership with the American Kennel Club (AKC), the main registry and governing body of canine events in United Statesthey exploit the AKC Meet the traveling Breeds® show. GF Sports & Entertainment also incubates new and emerging sports concepts, including Wolf Pack ninjawho operates ninja focused global events.

GF Sports & Entertainment was founded in July 2015 by New Yorkprivate equity firm based at GF Capital. For more information, please visit www.gfsportsandentertainment.com.

Show original content to download multimedia:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/dogs-set-to-take-over-dallas-with-akc-meet-the-breeds-301540844.html

SOURCE American Kennel Club

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AMERICAN KENNEL CLUB SPLASHES ON ESPN2 WITH AKC DIVING DOGS PREMIER CUP https://codogfederation.org/american-kennel-club-splashes-on-espn2-with-akc-diving-dogs-premier-cup/ Thu, 05 May 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://codogfederation.org/american-kennel-club-splashes-on-espn2-with-akc-diving-dogs-premier-cup/ NEW YORK, May 5, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — The American Kennel Club (AKC®) is thrilled to announce that the AKC Diving Dogs Premier Cup presented by The Farmer’s Dog will be broadcast on ESPN2. The competition will be televised on Monday May 16and to 7 p.m. ET. This year, the AKC Diving Dogs Premier Cup, organized […]]]>

NEW YORK, May 5, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — The American Kennel Club (AKC®) is thrilled to announce that the AKC Diving Dogs Premier Cup presented by The Farmer’s Dog will be broadcast on ESPN2. The competition will be televised on Monday May 16and to 7 p.m. ET.

This year, the AKC Diving Dogs Premier Cup, organized in collaboration with North American Diving Dogs, took place on April 2, 2022at the World Equestrian Center of Ocala, Florida. Dogs from across the country competed in distance and aerial retrieval, with the top three from each receiving cash prizes.

“Diving Dogs is a fun, action-packed competition, and we’re thrilled to bring it to ESPN viewers,” said Gina DiNardo, Executive Secretary of the AKC. “The excitement in the air was palpable, and we’re sure viewers at home will feel it too.”

The show will be hosted by ESPN’s Phil Murphyincluding play-by-play by a sports facilitator caroline manno and analysis by Bill Ellis.

About the American Kennel Club
Founded in 1884, the American Kennel Club is a nonprofit organization that maintains the world’s largest purebred dog registry and oversees the sport of purebred dogs in United States. The AKC is dedicated to maintaining the integrity of its registry, promoting the sport of purebred dogs, and breeding for type and function. With its more than 5,000 chartered and member clubs and affiliated organizations, the AKC champions the purebred dog as a family companion, advances canine health and welfare, strives to protect the rights of all dog owners and promotes responsible dog ownership. More than 22,000 competitions for AKC-registered purebred and mixed breed dogs are held each year under AKC rules and regulations, including conformation, agility, obedience, rallying, tracking , herding, lure racing, coonhound events, hunt tests, field and land dog tests. Organizations affiliated with the AKC include the AKC Humane Fund, AKC Canine Health Foundation, AKC Reunite, and AKC Museum of the Dog. For more information, visit www.akc.org.

AKC, American Kennel Club, the American Kennel Club seal and design, and all related marks and logos are trademarks, registered trademarks, and service marks of American Kennel Club, Inc.

Become a fan of the American Kennel Club on Facebook and follow us on Twitter @AKCDogLovers

SOURCE American Kennel Club

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Genetic study challenges dog breed stereotypes https://codogfederation.org/genetic-study-challenges-dog-breed-stereotypes/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 18:01:13 +0000 https://codogfederation.org/genetic-study-challenges-dog-breed-stereotypes/ The American Kennel Club website outlines the ideal shape and temperament of 204 dog breeds, from the Affenpinscher (“loyal, curious, and notoriously fun”) to the Yorkshire Terrier (“feisty, courageous, and sometimes bossy”). The idea that certain breeds reliably exhibit distinct behaviors is embedded in dog shows, obedience training, and canine DNA testing, not to mention […]]]>

The American Kennel Club website outlines the ideal shape and temperament of 204 dog breeds, from the Affenpinscher (“loyal, curious, and notoriously fun”) to the Yorkshire Terrier (“feisty, courageous, and sometimes bossy”). The idea that certain breeds reliably exhibit distinct behaviors is embedded in dog shows, obedience training, and canine DNA testing, not to mention race-specific laws deemed prone to aggression.

Yet a detailed new study of dog behavior and genetics suggests that race actually has little value by anticipating the behavior or behavior of any individual animal.

After collecting extensive data from the owners of more than 18,000 dogs and sequencing the DNA of more than 2,100 of these pets, the researchers found surprisingly few links between breed and most behavioral traits.

Yes, owners of Labrador Retrievers and Golden Retrievers were slightly more likely to rate their puppies in the top 25% for “human sociability” than the owner of a randomly selected dog. And yes, dogs of hunting breeds were more likely to score higher in terms of “submissiveness,” or the ease with which they respond to human commands. But such associations were neither strong nor consistent.

Indeed, breed explained no more than 9% of behavioral variation in the dogs in the study, the study co-author said. Elinor Karlsson, a geneticist at the University of Massachusetts Chan Medical School. A dog’s age and sex were often much better predictors of its behavior, and for some traits, including aggression, breed made no difference.

The results were published Thursday in the journal Science.

Each of the nearly 1 billion dogs currently prancing around the planet belongs to the same species – Canis familiaris. They separated from wolves around 10,000 years ago, which wasn’t long enough for them to accumulate that much genetic diversity. (Mammalian species typically evolve over hundreds of thousands of years.)

The concept of the modern dog breed was invented only about 160 years ago, in what the authors call “a blink of an eye in evolutionary history.” Only a few genetic differences are responsible for the striking variations we see in the shape and appearance of dogs.

Physical traits are strongly inherited; behavioral traits, less. These are governed by a complex mix of genetic and environmental factors in which race plays only a small, often insignificant role.

“What a dog looks like isn’t really going to tell you what a dog looks like,” said Marjie Alonso, executive director of the International Assn. of Animal Behavior Consultants and co-author of the study.

The team created an open database, Darwin’s Ark, to collect information about individual dogs. Owners were asked to answer over 100 questions about their dog’s appearance, behaviors and personality.

Jack, who is a one-quarter American pit bull terrier, was included in the dog breed and behavior study.

(Jane O’Donnell)

The result was a dataset that well reflected the companion dog population in the United States. Nearly half (49.2%) of participants described their dogs as purebred, with the proportion of breeds represented roughly matching dog ownership in the United States.

Purebred dog owners tend to describe their pets’ behavior in ways that fit breed stereotypes, the authors wrote. This raised the possibility that owners’ ratings were influenced – consciously or not – by the reputation of their dog’s breed.

Fortunately, the other dogs in the study were pooches whose ambiguous ancestry left their owners relatively free of any preconceptions about their past or behavior. They served as a sort of control group.

Researchers found that golden retriever owners tended to say their pets weren’t afraid of strangers, a description that fits the breed’s outgoing reputation. However, pooch owners with golden retriever ancestry were no more likely to describe their pets as unafraid of strangers than pooch owners without golden retriever DNA.

Similarly, Labrador Retriever owners tended to say their pets were social with humans, consistent with the stereotype that the breed is friendly and outgoing. But pooch owners with a Labrador retriever in their bloodlines were no more likely to call their dogs social around humans than pooch owners without that heritage.

If breed were a strong predictor of behavior, it stands to reason that the traits of those breeds would have manifested to some degree among pooches with those breeds’ DNA.

Even among purebred dogs, genetics was a much more reliable predictor of a dog’s appearance than its behavior.

“Physical traits are super hereditary,” Karlsson said. Yet when it comes to behavior, “race is a very poor predictor. It is not an accurate way to predict the behavior of any particular dog.

But there were patterns in certain traits like submissiveness and a dog’s propensity to grab and bite toys, she added.

Border collies, for example, tend to fetch more than the average dog. Choosing a border collie as a pet can increase your chances of getting a compliant animal, but it doesn’t guarantee that the specific dog you bring home will be naturally inclined to follow your commands.

Ellie, an avid hiker and rescue dog, stands on a steep rock near a shore.

Ellie, an avid hiker and rescue dog, was one of the pooches included in the study of dog breeds and behavior.

(@wanderswild / Instagram)

In the millennia before the Victorian obsession with dog herding began, humans distinguished dogs mainly by the tasks they did best. Some puppies were good at herding, others at hunting or guarding. A now extinct type known as “spit”, or kitchen dog, was bred to run on a sort of dog-sized hamster wheel that turned roasting spits over flames, said Catherine Grierretired professor of history from the University of Delaware and author of the book “Pets in America: A History”.

In “The Invention of the Modern Dog: Breed and Blood in Victorian Britain”, authors Michael Worboys, Julie-Marie Strange and Neil Pemberton compared the difference between dogs before and after breeding in the colors of a rainbow. sky compared to a paint book. fries. Initially, there were a few large types of dogs with a lot of overlap between them. Breeding has taken this barking rainbow and broken it down into isolated, clearly defined units.

The American Kennel Club maintains the largest registry of purebred dogs in the United States, along with detailed descriptions for each breed standard, including personality traits. (The Chow chow is “dignified, brilliant, serious”; the Chihuahua is “charming, graceful, sassy”.)

The club said it believed the data from the study was strong, but disagreed with the authors’ conclusions.

“Racial behavior was not created with the formation of races 100 years ago. It was created based on selected working behaviors over centuries – and before the separation of individual races,” said the chief veterinarian. Dr. Jerry Klein said in a statement. “Therefore, attempting to separate individual breeds based on behavior would not be fruitful without separating them into selected ancestral populations of herding dogs, hunting dogs, etc.”

Historians of dog breeding counter that breeders’ preference for specific physical traits over the years has often come at the expense of original behaviors. Dog breed is largely defined by an animal’s appearance, and “when you breed for looks, you can lose behaviors,” Grier said.

When it comes to canine behavior, genes “have an effect, but it’s less than the effect genes have on physical traits,” he said. Danika Bannasch, an animal geneticist at UC Davis who was not involved in the study. “This is the largest-scale study of genes and behavior of its kind and is sure to make a lot of people stop and think about dogs a little differently.”

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measure would ban the sale of dogs and cats in pet stores | News, Sports, Jobs https://codogfederation.org/measure-would-ban-the-sale-of-dogs-and-cats-in-pet-stores-news-sports-jobs/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 18:31:23 +0000 https://codogfederation.org/measure-would-ban-the-sale-of-dogs-and-cats-in-pet-stores-news-sports-jobs/ ALBANY — A push to ban the sale of commercially bred dogs, cats and rabbits in New York pet stores is gaining momentum at the state Capitol, humane treatment of animals advocates said last week. . The measure, sponsored by Congresswoman Linda Rosenthal, D-Manhattan, and Deputy Senate Majority Leader Michael Gianaris, D-Queens, would […]]]>

ALBANY — A push to ban the sale of commercially bred dogs, cats and rabbits in New York pet stores is gaining momentum at the state Capitol, humane treatment of animals advocates said last week. .

The measure, sponsored by Congresswoman Linda Rosenthal, D-Manhattan, and Deputy Senate Majority Leader Michael Gianaris, D-Queens, would make New York the sixth state in the nation to target what animal activists call the “puppy mill pipeline” supply stores with puppies and kittens.

Since the measure was approved last year by the state Senate, the biggest remaining hurdle is the Assembly. But Libby Post, executive director of the New York State Animal Welfare Federation, said she was optimistic the legislation would be supported by both houses this year.

“We all now know what goes on in puppy mills and how horrible the conditions are,” Post said. “We’ve seen the videos, we’ve seen the images.”

Post said many New York pet stores have already stopped offering puppies and kittens for sale, relying on selling pet food and supplies, with some working directly with shelters. to facilitate sales to consumers.

California enacted a similar ban in 2017. Since then, Maryland, Maine, Washington and Illinois have banned the sale of dogs and cats in pet stores. New York would become the sixth state to do so, if legislation progresses here. Across the country, some 400 municipalities have imposed local bans on the sale of dogs and cats in pet stores.

A spokeswoman for the American Kennel Club, representing 217 kennel clubs in New York and thousands of dog owners, said the organization is renewing objections to the measure. The AKC, which represents the world’s largest purebred dog registry, said New York’s bill would limit consumer choice and “having a negative impact on dogs and dog owners in the state.”

By pressuring pet stores to form alliances with shelter organizations, the state would effectively remove a regulated source of pets from these businesses while creating a “perverse request” for dogs that do not benefit from animal welfare regulations, the AKC said in opposing New York’s legislation.

When the state Senate approved the proposal a year ago with a 57-6 vote, supporters included Senate GOP leader Rob Ortt of R-Niagara County and Sen. Peter Oberacker , of R-Otsego County. Among those weighing with a “Nope” voting was Senator Dan Stec, R-Queensbury.

Brian Shapiro, New York State director for the Humane Society of the United States, said the state’s efforts to curb “puppy mills” have proven crucial, claiming that the federal government has not been effective in regulating these outlets,

Visits by Humane Society staff members to these outlets revealed evidence of sick dogs, “consumer scams” and “misleading” statements about the source of the pets, Shapiro said.

An investigation by the Humane Society led a state judge to fine Manhattan’s Chelsea Kennel Club $3.9 million for selling sick animals, he noted.

But Emilio Ortiz, director of Citipups, with several pet stores in New York, said the bill being considered in Albany is misguided and paints a misleading view of pet stores.

“It punishes good actors who actually don’t do anything wrong,” Ortiz said.

“They take the worst examples of pet stores and say all stores are like that, instead of weighing the good and the bad,” Ortiz said.

Another trade organization, the Pet Industry Joint Advisory Council, is also trying to convince lawmakers to reject the legislation.

He argues that the worst breeders will escape punishment as “responsible” pet stores will be forced to close and lay off their employees.



Today’s breaking news and more to your inbox







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Advocates Push for State Ban on Sale of Dogs and Cats in Pet Stores | News, Sports, Jobs https://codogfederation.org/advocates-push-for-state-ban-on-sale-of-dogs-and-cats-in-pet-stores-news-sports-jobs/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 05:21:49 +0000 https://codogfederation.org/advocates-push-for-state-ban-on-sale-of-dogs-and-cats-in-pet-stores-news-sports-jobs/ ALBANY — A push to ban the sale of commercially bred dogs, cats and rabbits in New York pet stores is gaining momentum at the state Capitol, advocates for the humane treatment of animals said Wednesday. The measure, sponsored by Congresswoman Linda Rosenthal, D-Manhattan, and Deputy Senate Majority Leader Michael Gianaris, D-Queens, would […]]]>

ALBANY — A push to ban the sale of commercially bred dogs, cats and rabbits in New York pet stores is gaining momentum at the state Capitol, advocates for the humane treatment of animals said Wednesday.

The measure, sponsored by Congresswoman Linda Rosenthal, D-Manhattan, and Deputy Senate Majority Leader Michael Gianaris, D-Queens, would make New York the sixth state in the nation to target what animal activists call the “puppy mill pipeline” supply stores with puppies and kittens.

Since the measure was approved last year by the state Senate, the biggest remaining hurdle is the Assembly. But Libby Post, executive director of the New York State Animal Welfare Federation, said she was optimistic the legislation would be supported by both houses this year.

“We all now know what goes on in puppy mills and how horrible the conditions are,” Post said. “We’ve seen the videos, we’ve seen the images.”

Post said many New York pet stores have already stopped offering puppies and kittens for sale, relying on selling pet food and supplies, with some working directly with shelters. to facilitate sales to consumers.

California enacted a similar ban in 2017. Since then, Maryland, Maine, Washington and Illinois have banned the sale of dogs and cats in pet stores. New York would become the sixth state to do so, if legislation progresses here. Across the country, some 400 municipalities have imposed local bans on the sale of dogs and cats in pet stores.

A spokeswoman for the American Kennel Club, representing 217 kennel clubs in New York and thousands of dog owners, said the organization is renewing objections to the measure. The AKC, which represents the world’s largest purebred dog registry, said New York’s bill would limit consumer choice and “having a negative impact on dogs and dog owners in the state.”

By pressuring pet stores to form alliances with shelter organizations, the state would effectively remove a regulated source of pets from these businesses while creating a “perverse request” for dogs that do not benefit from animal welfare regulations, the AKC said in opposing New York’s legislation.

When the state Senate approved the proposal a year ago with a 57-6 vote, supporters included Senate GOP leader Rob Ortt of R-Niagara County and Sen. Peter Oberacker , of R-Otsego County. Among those weighing with a “Nope” voting was Senator Dan Stec, R-Queensbury.

Brian Shapiro, New York State director for the Humane Society of the United States, said the state’s efforts to curb “puppy mills” have proven crucial, claiming that the federal government has not been effective in regulating these outlets,

Visits by Humane Society staff members to these outlets revealed evidence of sick dogs, “consumer scams” and “misleading” statements about the source of the pets, Shapiro said.

An investigation by the Humane Society led a state judge to fine Manhattan’s Chelsea Kennel Club $3.9 million for selling sick animals, he noted.

But Emilio Ortiz, director of Citipups, with several pet stores in New York, said the bill being considered in Albany is misguided and paints a misleading view of pet stores.

“It punishes good actors who don’t actually do anything wrong,” Ortiz said.

“They take the worst examples of pet stores and say all stores are like that, instead of weighing the good and the bad,” Ortiz said.

Another trade organization, the Pet Industry Joint Advisory Council, is also trying to convince lawmakers to reject the legislation.

He argues that the worst breeders will escape punishment as “responsible” pet stores will be forced to close and lay off their employees.



Today’s breaking news and more to your inbox






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New York measure would ban the sale of dogs and cats in pet stores | News https://codogfederation.org/new-york-measure-would-ban-the-sale-of-dogs-and-cats-in-pet-stores-news/ Sat, 23 Apr 2022 19:00:00 +0000 https://codogfederation.org/new-york-measure-would-ban-the-sale-of-dogs-and-cats-in-pet-stores-news/ ALBANY, NY – A push to ban the sale of commercially bred dogs, cats and rabbits in New York pet stores is gaining momentum at the state Capitol, animal humane advocates said Wednesday. . The measure, sponsored by Assemblywoman Linda Rosenthal, D-Manhattan, and Deputy Senate Majority Leader Michael Gianaris, D-Queens, would make New York the […]]]>

ALBANY, NY – A push to ban the sale of commercially bred dogs, cats and rabbits in New York pet stores is gaining momentum at the state Capitol, animal humane advocates said Wednesday. .

The measure, sponsored by Assemblywoman Linda Rosenthal, D-Manhattan, and Deputy Senate Majority Leader Michael Gianaris, D-Queens, would make New York the sixth state in the nation to target what activists for animals call the “puppy mill pipeline” supplying stores. with puppies and kittens.

Since the measure was approved last year by the state Senate, the biggest remaining hurdle is the Assembly. But Libby Post, executive director of the New York State Animal Welfare Federation, said she was optimistic the legislation would be supported by both houses this year.

“We all now know what goes on in puppy mills and how horrible the conditions are,” Post said. “We’ve seen the videos, we’ve seen the images.”

Post said many New York pet stores have already stopped offering puppies and kittens for sale, relying on selling pet food and supplies, with some working directly with shelters. to facilitate sales to consumers.

California enacted a similar ban in 2017. Since then, Maryland, Maine, Washington and Illinois have banned the sale of dogs and cats in pet stores. New York would become the sixth state to do so, if legislation progresses here. Across the country, some 400 municipalities have imposed local bans on the sale of dogs and cats in pet stores.

A spokeswoman for the American Kennel Club, representing 217 kennel clubs in New York and thousands of dog owners, said the organization is renewing objections to the measure. The AKC, which represents the world’s largest purebred dog registry, said New York’s bill would limit consumer choice and “negatively impact dogs and dog owners in the world.” State”.

By pressuring pet stores to form alliances with shelter organizations, the state would effectively remove a regulated source of pets from these businesses while creating “perverse demand” for dogs that do not benefit. animal welfare regulations, the AKC said in opposing the New York law.

When the state Senate approved the proposal a year ago with a 57-6 vote, supporters included Senate GOP leader Rob Ortt of R-Niagara County and Sen. Peter Oberacker , of R-Otsego County. Among those weighing in with a “no” vote was Senator Dan Stec, R-Queensbury.

Brian Shapiro, New York State director for the Humane Society of the United States, said the state’s efforts to reduce “puppy mills” have proven crucial, saying the federal government hasn’t not been effective in regulating these outlets,

Visits by Humane Society staff members to these outlets revealed evidence of sick dogs, “consumer scams” and “misleading” claims about the source of the pets, Shapiro said.

An investigation by the Humane Society resulted in a state judge imposing $3.9 million in fines on Manhattan’s Chelsea Kennel Club for selling sick animals, he noted.

But Emilio Ortiz, director of Citipups, with several pet stores in New York, said the bill being considered in Albany is misguided and paints a misleading view of pet stores.

“It punishes good actors who don’t do anything wrong,” Ortiz said.

“They take the worst examples of pet stores and say all stores are like that, instead of weighing the good and the bad,” Ortiz said.

Another trade organization, the Pet Industry Joint Advisory Council, is also trying to convince lawmakers to reject the legislation.

He argues that the worst breeders will escape punishment while “responsible” pet stores will be forced to close and lay off their employees.

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The government program that killed an Idaho dog is still active https://codogfederation.org/the-government-program-that-killed-an-idaho-dog-is-still-active/ Thu, 21 Apr 2022 17:41:40 +0000 https://codogfederation.org/the-government-program-that-killed-an-idaho-dog-is-still-active/ You may remember a story from Pocatello a few years ago where a family dog ​​was killed by a cyanide bomb. A teenager was sickened by the same device. It was planted on a hill near the family home and while the two were playing, the dog triggered the release. The bomb was an animal […]]]>

You may remember a story from Pocatello a few years ago where a family dog ​​was killed by a cyanide bomb. A teenager was sickened by the same device. It was planted on a hill near the family home and while the two were playing, the dog triggered the release. The bomb was an animal trap set by a United States government agency. I felt like the program ended after the boy dodged death.

Your government has quite the kill ratio

A National Geographic story says wildlife services accidentally killed 3,000 animals last year with baited bombs. You can read the story of click here.

The objective of the program is to eliminate animals accused of depredation. Seems to me there must be a better way. I have no problem getting rid of pests. I draw a line at what often amounts to animal torture. Especially those who are not the intended targets. You can try to use computer technology, but even that is not foolproof. Have you ever searched for the word dog on Google Photos and seen pictures of cats popping up?

Poison bombs are tools of torture

Frankly, I think guys with long guns are the best medicine. They know what vermin looks like. Give them the chance and they’ll clean up this mess without killing indiscriminately.

By the way, government bureaucrats object to being treated like a bunch of lazy idiots. I agree that there are many dedicated public servants and they serve honorably. However, programs like the one involving cyanide traps contribute to the perception of incompetence.

WARNING: These are the deadliest animals in the world

Check out these 50 fascinating facts about dogs:

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James Arthur Rooker – Davison Index https://codogfederation.org/james-arthur-rooker-davison-index/ Thu, 14 Apr 2022 16:08:29 +0000 https://codogfederation.org/james-arthur-rooker-davison-index/ JAMES ARTHUR ROOKER, 91, of Davison, MI, passed away on Saturday, April 2, 2022. Cremation has taken place. Services provided by Allen Funeral Home will include visitation on Wednesday, April 20, 2022 from 4-7 p.m. The memorial service will be held Thursday, April 21, 2022 at 1:00 p.m., with the Reverend Dr. Joseph Novak officiating, […]]]>

JAMES ARTHUR ROOKER, 91, of Davison, MI, passed away on Saturday, April 2, 2022. Cremation has taken place. Services provided by Allen Funeral Home will include visitation on Wednesday, April 20, 2022 from 4-7 p.m. The memorial service will be held Thursday, April 21, 2022 at 1:00 p.m., with the Reverend Dr. Joseph Novak officiating, with one hour prior visitation. A celebration of life for Jim and Jeanne, who predeceased him on February 1, will be held at the farm this summer.

Jim was born in Saginaw, MI on June 7, 1930, the son of the late John and Fay (Scull) Rooker. Jim graduated from Saginaw Arthur Hill in 1948. His strong sense of leadership began with his involvement in 4-H and the FFA. He was the recipient of the Upjohn Richland colt for his accomplishments in his senior year of 4-H. Jim attended Michigan State University, studied animal husbandry, went on to the College of Veterinary Medicine, and graduated in 1954. While at MSU, he joined the Block and Bridle Club where he met the love of his life, Jeanne. He married Jeanne Ackerman on December 19, 1953. After graduation, Jim served his country in the US Army Veterinary Corps, stationed in Chicago, Illinois and then Kansas City, MO.

Back in Michigan, Jim and Jeanne opened their co-ed veterinary clinic in 1958 and were later joined by Jim’s brother, John. Jim enjoyed sharing his veterinary knowledge as an assistant adjunct professor. He hosted Michigan State veterinary students on his many riding calls as well as at the hospital. In 2012, he was honored to receive the “Rooker Award for Excellence in Equine Practice” from the College of Veterinary Medicine. Jim was an active member of Davison Kiwanis, Rotary and the Genesee County Agricultural Society Board. He has served on the board of directors of the Michigan Quarter Horse Association, the Arabian Horse Association of Michigan, the Michigan Horse Show Association, and the American Horse Show Association. He was honored by the MHSA as “Equestrian of the Year” for his commitment to youth development by co-founding the All-Breed Youth Horse Show in Detroit and for donating a foal six years in a row to deserving 4-H members. In addition, Jim has served on the Arabian Horse Registry as a governing member for 31 years, five of which as president. Believing in the preservation of the Arabian horse, he was also a member of the Purebred Arabian Trust which established the Arabian Horse Gallery in Lexington, Kentucky.

Jim and Jeanne have had many great adventures with their horses, won countless awards and met many great friends from across the country. Together they are proud breeders of 264 Arabian horses and have owned 468 Arabian and half-Arabian horses.

Jim is survived by his loving daughters, Nancy (Robert) Meszko, Deborah (Kenneth) Geuns and Janet (David Johnston) Rooker; granddaughter, Christina (Fiancé, Jeff MacNaughton) Geuns; special cousin, George (Barbara) Killeen; special friends, Ken Merritt, Melissa (Tim) Wandrey and their daughters, James Johnson (Diana); dear brothers and sisters, William (Sandra) Rooker, Jean Rooker, John K. Rooker, Margaret Gehl and Shirley (Ronald) Gavenda; many other loving families and friends. In addition to his parents, he was predeceased by his beloved wife, Jeanne; father and stepmother, John and Helen Ackerman; brother, Gerald Rooker; brother-in-law, Gerald Gehl and sister-in-law, Jane Rooker.

Memorial contributions may be made to the Purebred Arabian Trust, c/o Robert Fauls, 9714 Niblick Lane, Naples, FL 34108; the Arab Riders Distress Fund, c/o Mary Trowbridge, 236 Henry Sanford Rd., Bridgewater, CT 06752; or the MSU College of Veterinary Medicine, Clinic Pet Memorial Program, Development and Alumni Relations at cvm.msu.edu/friends-alumni/memorial-gifts-and-gifts-in-honor.

Please share your thoughts with the family at www.allenfuneralhomeinc.com

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Buda Lions Club hosts 25th annual post-lockdown sausage dog race https://codogfederation.org/buda-lions-club-hosts-25th-annual-post-lockdown-sausage-dog-race/ Wed, 13 Apr 2022 15:47:41 +0000 https://codogfederation.org/buda-lions-club-hosts-25th-annual-post-lockdown-sausage-dog-race/ by CJ Vetter Buda – On April 23-24, the Lions Club will hold its 25th annual Wiener Dog Race in Buda City Park with a grand prize of $500 for first place. It will be the first race since the start of the COVID-19 outbreak, with the previous two years of races canceled due to […]]]>

by CJ Vetter

Buda – On April 23-24, the Lions Club will hold its 25th annual Wiener Dog Race in Buda City Park with a grand prize of $500 for first place. It will be the first race since the start of the COVID-19 outbreak, with the previous two years of races canceled due to the virus.

The event registry is currently active, with attendance costing $25 per dog, with a $5 late fee for same-day registry. For those whose dogs might not have participated in their game, there is an option for their dachshund to have another shot; for $10 the dog can be placed in the next available race. Plus, if you’re worried your pooch isn’t quite up to being a purebred dog for the vets on hand, there’s also a mixed breed available. No medical documents will be required at the registry, but owners will be required to provide them if necessary.

There will also be the Saber Guild, a Star Wars-inspired hobby group, and musical performances by The Merles and Western Express. Additionally, the event will also be a competition certified by the International Barbeque Cookers Association. Food will be provided by various vendors, alongside numerous arts and crafts stalls. Limited capacity parking will be available at Buda City Park and Cabela’s Sporting Goods; buses will be available for those who park at Cabela’s. Lions Club members Charles and Nancy Handrick are two of the volunteers who help organize the races.

“We put out the information, and she said she already had just over 100 dogs registered, and that’s pre-registration. So on the day we have a lot of appointments,” Charles Hendrick said.

The history of the Buda Wiener Dog Races dates back 25 years, after one of the Lions Club members witnessed a Wiener Dog race elsewhere; inspired, the club member took the idea back to her club in Buda and organized the event. The race quickly caught the public’s attention after CBS reporter Bill Geist reported on it, and soon it grew from a 35-dog race to a 400+ dog destination for enthusiasts. dachshunds across the country. While the number of participating wiener dogs has dwindled since then and the past two years have been skipped, the club is eager to start again. The races, which are done with four to five dogs at a time, can become competitive with strict regulations in place.

“For us, we put them in the back of the box, and you come in the front of the box. You attract the attention of your puppies; Then we will ask the owner to step back 70 feet and then 15 feet further as long as you keep your dog’s attention, and one of the stipulations being that there is no real food on the race track,” said Charles Hendrick. “Real runners who come out there who run for the money, they’ve trained their dogs and trained. I would say about 90% of them are here for the atmosphere.

James Michael (Mike) Huckaby

The Lions Club did, however, suffer some losses, the most notable being the death of James Michael (Mike) Huckaby in February this year. Huckaby, in addition to being a veteran decorated with a double purple heart, had been the Wiener Dog race announcer for the past 24 years and was a charter member of the Lions Club. Huckaby even celebrated his life in the Buda City Park, the location of the annual race. Another club member who helped organize the event, Keith Cooper, also died. Huckaby’s successor will be Keith Handrick, son of Nancy and Charles.

“Every day he lived his life to the fullest.” said Nancy Handrick.

The latest race is shaping up to be the most spectacular yet, with a host of novelties and age-old traditions. This year will see the use of a new pedal racing gate, as well as a new poster and theme spoofing the “Lion King”, nicknamed the “Wiener King”. The theme itself was developed for the Lions Club by William Marketing, and like previous years’ themes “Wonder Wiener” and “Game of Wieners”, it will be available for purchase on the website as a poster. alongside other goods. William Marketing also provided the huge first place trophy.

“They love their dogs. Don’t say anything derogatory about little sausage dogs. This year, this poster, it was drawn by hand; well, we didn’t really hold a dog, because a lady called us over and said “that’s not how you hold a sausage dog,” said Charles Handrick. “Yes ma’am, no dogs were harmed in the making of this poster.”

The Lions Club is an international non-profit organization dedicated to helping serve their communities and helping people with visual impairments. They also offer services for the blind and diabetics, as well as operating the Texas Lions Camp for physically handicapped children. For more information, visit LionsClub.org or BudaLionsClub.com

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