Kennel club – Codogfederation http://codogfederation.org/ Sun, 08 May 2022 22:09:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://codogfederation.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-71-120x120.png Kennel club – Codogfederation http://codogfederation.org/ 32 32 Badger Kennel Club hosts Badger Classic Dog Show https://codogfederation.org/badger-kennel-club-hosts-badger-classic-dog-show/ Sun, 08 May 2022 22:09:00 +0000 https://codogfederation.org/badger-kennel-club-hosts-badger-classic-dog-show/ May 8, 2022 5:09 p.m. Post : May 8, 2022 5:09 p.m. Update: May 8, 2022 8:50 p.m. STOUGHTON, Wis. – “It’s just a smaller version of Westminster in your garden!” Showing dogs has always felt like home to Tami Jackson. “I am a second generation person. [I] grew up with this breed – [I] […]]]>

STOUGHTON, Wis. – “It’s just a smaller version of Westminster in your garden!”

Showing dogs has always felt like home to Tami Jackson.

“I am a second generation person. [I] grew up with this breed – [I] grew up doing this,” said Tami, who is a member of the Badger Kennel Club.

And this weekend, she was able to continue that tradition.

“There are plenty of opportunities to participate in events with your dog across the country every weekend,” Tami said.

The Badger Classic Dog Show hosted nearly 600 attendees at numerous events.

“You might see agility and other performance events that really try to see how well the person and the dog work together as a team,” Tami said.

There are a ton of events sponsored by the American Kennel Club. Everything from barn hunting to FAST Cat.

The FAST Cat is a timed 100-yard dash that is separate from the dog show.

“Dogs love it, there’s no training. The dog chases a lure or runs towards mom,” said Joan Mrkvicka, president of FAST Cat of the Badger Kennel Club.

“You can hear the dogs are excited to get on the line and chase that lure.”

Both events help the Badger Kennel Club – which has been around for 80 years.

“We’re a non-profit club so it’s a big money maker for us to help pay for everything,” Joan said.

The support allows these traditions to be passed on to the next series of dog shows.

“Now I have [my own generation] who is interested in learning to work with a dog,” Tami said.

“I love doing it. I love working with people and their dogs,” Joan said.

For more information about Badger Kennel Club, visit here.

]]>
Dachshunds Sniff and Become Unlikely Cadaver Dogs – American Kennel Club https://codogfederation.org/dachshunds-sniff-and-become-unlikely-cadaver-dogs-american-kennel-club/ Thu, 05 May 2022 18:37:01 +0000 https://codogfederation.org/dachshunds-sniff-and-become-unlikely-cadaver-dogs-american-kennel-club/ Sue Stejskal walked slowly on her stomach through a dark crawl space that may have once housed the corpse of a murder victim. A headlamp was all she had for light. She was in this predicament because of Chili Dawg, a sweet 8-pound dachshund with straight hair the color of a caramel milkshake. Stejskal got […]]]>

Sue Stejskal walked slowly on her stomach through a dark crawl space that may have once housed the corpse of a murder victim. A headlamp was all she had for light.

She was in this predicament because of Chili Dawg, a sweet 8-pound dachshund with straight hair the color of a caramel milkshake. Stejskal got the dog a few years earlier as a pet and show dog. Somehow, her adorable little pup had grown up to be a dead dog, trained to smell death.

When detectives needed help with a 20-year-old cold case, they contacted a 5-foot-2 woman and her sniffer dog, which was a little bigger than an iPhone on her shoulder. It may seem like an odd choice, but for this job, no one would have been better.

“We were called in because of her size,” Stejskal explains, “she was small enough to fit into the crawl space.” Chili’s nose provided clues that helped the case.

No kidding

Dachshunds aren’t exactly what comes to mind when people say “police dog.” In popular culture, their sausage bodies, pointy noses and Who? Me? expressions are the stuff of comedy. No Halloween parade is complete without a few sausage dogs on a bun.

Recently, South Australia Police announced a new division – Urban Search and Small Area Guided Evacuation Dogs – made up of three Dachshunds. “We can throw them under beds, in closets and other furniture,” the police commissioner said. “We can even attach them to drones.”

It was April Fools.

All kidding aside, dachshunds possess many qualities that make them suitable for detective work. Insightful noses are just one part of it. They were developed in 17th century Germany to hunt badgers, wild animals weighing 25 to 40 pounds of teeth, muscle and bad attitude. The short legs and long, low bodies of the dachshund are designed to dive into tunnels after their prey.

The ideal Dachsie temperament, the breed standard notes, is “intelligent, lively and courageous to the point of recklessness”. As Stejskal said when describing Chili, “She was like a Malinois trapped in a sausage dog costume.”

A quarter and a dream

Whippets and Cardigan Welsh Corgis had been Stejskal’s breeds for 30 years, and she participated in conformation, obedience and tracking. Then, in the late 1990s, a series of surgeries limited his upper body strength. A smaller dog, she thought, might be easier to handle.

She had a 10-week-old Miniature Wirehaired Dachshund puppy in 2001. Chili quickly won her AKC Championship, passed her Canine Good Citizen test, and earned a Novice Tracking and Rally title.

It was a common thread, full of energy and curiosity. Stejskal struggled to find ways to occupy it. Then she remembered a book she had picked up for a quarter at a library sale eight years earlier. They were search and rescue dogs.

“I never thought about the possibility of getting involved,” she recalls. “But I had a dog, a dog with a nose, a dog that loved to use it. Maybe?”

She called the president of a national search dog organization and described Chili’s drive and eagerness. She waited until the end to reveal that she was talking about an 8 pound dachshund. To her great surprise, the experienced trainer did not react with derision or discouragement. All that mattered, the woman said, was whether the dog was eager to learn. Well, she was.

In about a year and a half, Chili and Stejskal have mastered the skills needed to become a human remains detection team for land and water searches. During his 11-year career in law, Chili has located human remains associated with homicides, suicides, drownings and missing persons cases.

“Chili was a force to be reckoned with,” says Stejskal. “She went through life not knowing how small she was. … In a search, the words I use to describe Chile are intense, obsessed, driven and methodical. No matter what, she would arrive at the source. She never lost her focus. Chili was driven.

In the field, Stejskal carried the little dog in a backpack. She could tell if Chili had smelled the scent because she could sense a change in behavior in her furry detective. She was starting to move around in the bag, sniffling and digging.

Chili, who died at 16 and a half, helped solve many cases. Equally important, it opened up a whole new world for its owner, who had a background in science writing and education.

“Shortly after going down this path, I became a reserve deputy, which I did for 10 years, with our county sheriff’s department as well as a special deputy with the county,” she said. She served as a human remains detector dog and forensic evidence dog handler for the St. Joseph County, Michigan Sheriff’s Department for nearly 20 years. Her resume includes books on detector dogs and detecting bed bugs, and two children’s books on her partners—The Little Dog Who Did Big Things and Buzz visits Mackinac Island.

water works

In 2009, while Chili was still active, Stejskal added another detection dog to his team: the chocolate Labrador Retriever Buzz. Then, seven years later, she got Maple, an English Springer Spaniel.

In 2019, after a brilliant career, Buzz passed away. Stejskal decided it was “time to return to the world of little dogs who don’t know they’re little,” she says.

Enter Hundeleben Oh it’s Sheriff Woody Mw, RN, CGC, TKN. After years of dealing with the brutal and gritty world of crime, she figured she would have fun with Woody and participate in dog sports.

The universe had other plans.

Stejskal realized that there was still a great unmet need for K-9 noses in her community, and she missed being a part of that world. For a time she worked with Maple and Woody in detecting bed bugs. Then she returned to detecting human remains on the water.

Woody is gentler than his predecessor, but he turns into an accomplished water detector dog. Stejskal particularly admires his powers of concentration – his ability to ignore flocks of swans and other birds, for example – while he searches.

Woody is still in training, but he once helped recover a drowning victim. Late last year, he won an award – Neighborhood Dog Finder – from a regional chapter of the United States Police Canine Association. He was deputized and serves on the department’s crime scene unit and dive team, as well as the county’s Major Crimes Task Force.

Stejskal clearly loves what she does, but she points out that it’s not for everyone. It takes tremendous training, discipline, and dedication to be a K-9 handler for law enforcement. Still, she says, there are ways for everyone to experience the thrill of watching dogs search with their noses.

Many organized events are based on canine scent powers, such as earth dog, field trials, barn hunting, scent work, and tracking. “So many ways,” she says, “to enjoy the fun little packs we know as dachshunds.”

]]>
The Del Sur Kennel Club is launching a dog show on April 29 https://codogfederation.org/the-del-sur-kennel-club-is-launching-a-dog-show-on-april-29/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 01:19:00 +0000 https://codogfederation.org/the-del-sur-kennel-club-is-launching-a-dog-show-on-april-29/ The Kennel Club encourages animal lovers to donate to Ukraine. SAN DIEGO — Although today is the opening day of the Del Sur Kennel Club weekend dog show, Friday is reserved for the friendly Golden Retrievers. After brushing, blow-drying and of course the treat, these polite pups will take the ring. “Most dogs know what […]]]>

The Kennel Club encourages animal lovers to donate to Ukraine.

SAN DIEGO — Although today is the opening day of the Del Sur Kennel Club weekend dog show, Friday is reserved for the friendly Golden Retrievers.

After brushing, blow-drying and of course the treat, these polite pups will take the ring.

“Most dogs know what it’s all about,” said Joella Cunnington, president of the Del Sur Kennel Club. “There are dogs coming into the ring and they’re going to ‘find me’. No one else needs to come in”

Cunnington says this weekend, about 700 dogs of all breeds will be at the show, strutting in front of a judge at Bates Nut Farm in Valley Center.

But sunny San Diego is quite a distance from where Karina Harbuz was just eight months ago.

The problems she faces getting her dog ready for the ring pale in comparison to what her family is currently facing in Ukraine.

“It’s a really difficult situation,” Harbuz said. “My parents stay in Ukraine and my father is at war. I always try to call my mother, ask her how they are and try to help them as best I can,”

There is also a significant amount of animals trapped in the crossfire in Ukraine. Animal activists from the United States are traveling overseas to save as many as they can.

The Del Sur Kennel Club and the AKC are asking participants and animal lovers to donate to Equiwent, a German organization that helps people and animals.

Although getting your dog ready for the show may seem like an urgent matter, dog lovers everywhere realize that something is bigger than getting that blue ribbon.

“They’re the best group of people to ask,” Cunnington said. “Dog lovers are very generous”

WATCH RELATED: San Diego Humane Society returns from Poland after helping refugee pets (April 2022)

]]>
Yakima Valley Kennel Club Holds Free Public Dog Show https://codogfederation.org/yakima-valley-kennel-club-holds-free-public-dog-show/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 17:22:49 +0000 https://codogfederation.org/yakima-valley-kennel-club-holds-free-public-dog-show/ April 28, 2022 10:11 a.m. Post : April 28, 2022 10:11 a.m. Rob Miller showing his dog Tiffany’s Lady In Red at Angel K (aka Ginger) via Kaitlyn Price Photography YAKIMA, Wash. – A family event featuring the most talented and accurate show dogs in the Mid-Columbia region, the AKC All Breed Dog Show is […]]]>
Rob Miller showing his dog Tiffany’s Lady In Red at Angel K (aka Ginger) via Kaitlyn Price Photography

YAKIMA, Wash. – A family event featuring the most talented and accurate show dogs in the Mid-Columbia region, the AKC All Breed Dog Show is hosted by the Yakima Valley Kennel Club this weekend.

Held at the SOZO Athletic Complex at 2200 S 36th Ave in Yakima, the Dog Show is free and will run from April 29 through May 1. Parking is available on site but will be chargeable.

Events will begin each day around 8:00 a.m. and continue until the Best in Show ends, usually between 5:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m. PST. It will include several forms of competition, including conformation, rally and obedience trials, in addition to Jr. Showmanship competitions for puppies.

READ: Dogs recovered from Finley countryside with porcupine quills on their faces

On Saturday, the Pacific Northwest Miniature American Shepherd Club is hosting a Beginner Puppy Match that is also open to the public. This will be specifically for puppies aged four to six months.

Permission to host this event was granted in advance by the American Kennel Club.

All attendees were required to register by noon on April 13, 2022, to ensure attendees were set and ready for their chance to perform on a major platform.

Please note that Belgian Sheepdogs are not eligible for all of these events, according to the Yakima Valley Kennel Club team.

RECENT HIGHLIGHTS OF KAPP-KVEW STAFF:

READ: An overview of Adams County Sheriff’s Deputies training, K9 drug detection

]]>
Kendal and South Lakes vet praises Kennel Club breeding plan https://codogfederation.org/kendal-and-south-lakes-vet-praises-kennel-club-breeding-plan/ Thu, 21 Apr 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://codogfederation.org/kendal-and-south-lakes-vet-praises-kennel-club-breeding-plan/ A Kendal vet has welcomed a new scheme from the UK’s largest canine welfare organization to encourage responsible dog breeding among some popular breeds prone to health issues. Pet charity Blue Cross has estimated that around 20% of pet dogs in the UK are now flat-faced breeds, such as boxers, bulldogs, pugs and French bulldogs, […]]]>

A Kendal vet has welcomed a new scheme from the UK’s largest canine welfare organization to encourage responsible dog breeding among some popular breeds prone to health issues.

Pet charity Blue Cross has estimated that around 20% of pet dogs in the UK are now flat-faced breeds, such as boxers, bulldogs, pugs and French bulldogs, which may suffer from health problems such as eye disease, skin disease, respiratory obstruction and spinal deformities.

READ MORE: Pugs and French bulldogs could be banned in the UK amid fresh calls for a crackdown

Kendal vet Mhairi Helme, who works in the South Lakes and Lancashire, explained why these issues can occur, what owners should be aware of and how the Kennel Club aims to raise awareness of the problem.

“We call these dogs ‘brachycephalic’ and they are very popular despite their health issues,” she said.

“They look cute to people, are very interactive, and generally have nice personalities.

“They have very human traits, and also like to be ‘pampered’ and taken care of.

“However, they often tend to have spinal, neurological, ocular (large exposed and unprotected corneas, and dental (teeth crowded into abnormally short mouth) problems, but the main concern is respiratory.

“They have narrow nostrils with tiny windpipes, so any swelling in the pharynx or larynx can cause airway obstruction – it can collapse and the grunt many of them make when breathing is due to lack space to breathe properly.

BREEDING: People are advised to look for dogs with longer noses

“These dogs are prone to heatstroke and have difficulty cooling down as panting can exacerbate their breathing difficulties and are more at risk under anesthesia.

“They develop a syndrome called BOAS (brachycephalic obstructive airway syndrome) and it’s a downward spiral that can happen very quickly where they eventually have severe difficulty or can’t even breathe, and may require a tracheotomy (surgical opening of the airways).

“I’ve had patients who can be stressed in the kennel, then panting from stress, giving themselves BOAS and needing a tracheostomy, even though the underlying problem wasn’t a respiratory issue.

“The Kennel Club has started a program to mark the airways of certain brachycephalic dogs to encourage responsible breeding.

“Some French Bulldogs are much better and have the exercise tolerance of a Springer Spaniel for example.

“People would do well to ask for dogs with a less extreme brachycephalic conformation and not buy dogs whose parents are obviously not breathing well, but the diet is in its infancy and not yet widespread – that would be great to see him promoted.

“Many can’t even give birth and need a caesarean, which has huge ethical ramifications because a caesarean requires general anesthesia and puts the mother at risk.”

]]>
American Kennel Club Joins CVMA and AHI in Opposition to California Assembly Bill 1881 https://codogfederation.org/american-kennel-club-joins-cvma-and-ahi-in-opposition-to-california-assembly-bill-1881/ Tue, 19 Apr 2022 20:20:27 +0000 https://codogfederation.org/american-kennel-club-joins-cvma-and-ahi-in-opposition-to-california-assembly-bill-1881/ American Kennel Club Joins CVMA and AHI in Public Statement Opposing ‘Cats and Dogs Bill of Rights’ Due to Fears of Repercussions and Unseen Health Care Risks pets in California. The American Kennel Club (AKC) has joined the California Veterinary (CVMA) and the Animal Health Institute (AHI) in making a combined public statement opposing the […]]]>

American Kennel Club Joins CVMA and AHI in Public Statement Opposing ‘Cats and Dogs Bill of Rights’ Due to Fears of Repercussions and Unseen Health Care Risks pets in California.

The American Kennel Club (AKC) has joined the California Veterinary (CVMA) and the Animal Health Institute (AHI) in making a combined public statement opposing the California Assembly Bill of 1881, also known as the name “Dog and Cat Bill of Rights”. This new bill has raised concerns because, according to the groups above, it could infringe on a pet owner’s right to make health care decisions for their pet.

The American Kennel Club cares deeply about the welfare of all dogs,” Sheila Goffe, vice president of government relations, AKC, said in an organizational statement. “We are pleased to join the California Veterinary Medical Association and the Animal Health Institute in sharing our concerns about this proposal, which could undermine the rights and responsibilities of pet owners to make care decisions. appropriate for their animals.1

Through a letter sent to California State Representative Miguel Santiago, the author of the bill, and the Assembly’s Business and Professions Committee, the 3 groups voiced concerns of the bill if passed. The AKC, CVMA and AHI said the bill could make it difficult for pet owners and veterinarians to get proper care for their pets or to make decisions about what to do. their pets receive the best possible health care if adopted.1

“However, the Assembly Bill of 1881, titled the “Dog and Cat Bill of Rights,” does not pursue this objective. Instead of simply providing a list of helpful reminders and guidelines for pet owners, the bill signals a sea change in the legal status of pets and who is responsible for care decisions.If this bill becomes law, it could affect the rights of California pet owners and their veterinarians to make appropriate healthcare decisions that ensure the best possible care for their beloved pets,” the letter reads.2

]]>
Canine Cancer Webinar Series – American Kennel Club https://codogfederation.org/canine-cancer-webinar-series-american-kennel-club/ Tue, 19 Apr 2022 16:30:32 +0000 https://codogfederation.org/canine-cancer-webinar-series-american-kennel-club/ May is Pet Cancer Awareness Month. The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF) is hosting a series of pre-recorded, live webinars to share the latest advances in CHF-funded canine cancer research. Join us on Thursday evenings in May to learn more about lymphoma, hemangiosarcoma, and the role of hormone receptors in canine cancer. The series will […]]]>

May is Pet Cancer Awareness Month. The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF) is hosting a series of pre-recorded, live webinars to share the latest advances in CHF-funded canine cancer research. Join us on Thursday evenings in May to learn more about lymphoma, hemangiosarcoma, and the role of hormone receptors in canine cancer. The series will conclude with a LIVE Q&A discussion with the three presenters.

Registration is FREE during Pet Cancer Awareness Month – May 2022. After that, a recording of the entire series will be available pay-per-view through the AKC Canine College.

May 5, 2022 Predicting lymphoma in dogs

Presented by Dr. Daniel Promislow

May 12, 2022 Activation of the luteinizing hormone receptor in lymphoma and hemangiosarcoma

Presented by Dr. Michelle Kutzler

May 19, 2022 Towards curative results in canine hemangiosarcoma

Presented by Dr. Chand Khanna

May 26, 2022 Live Panel Q&A Session

Presented by Drs. Promislow, Kutzler and Khanna

Note – You must register for each session. If you can’t watch live, a recording will be shared a few days after each presentation. No continuing education credit was earned for this webinar series, but you may submit the information to your licensing board based on their policies.

Click here to learn more about CHF-funded canine cancer research.

]]>
More dogs needed for project to improve dog lifespan – American Kennel Club https://codogfederation.org/more-dogs-needed-for-project-to-improve-dog-lifespan-american-kennel-club/ Tue, 19 Apr 2022 15:50:48 +0000 https://codogfederation.org/more-dogs-needed-for-project-to-improve-dog-lifespan-american-kennel-club/ A short-legged, long-tailed dog greeted 12-year-old Jinnie Strickland when she got off the school bus. She had never seen it before, but the little dog wiggled and jumped and acted like she was her long-lost friend. He followed her home and stayed. “I studied the Book of Dogs and decided he was a Cardigan Welsh […]]]>

A short-legged, long-tailed dog greeted 12-year-old Jinnie Strickland when she got off the school bus.

She had never seen it before, but the little dog wiggled and jumped and acted like she was her long-lost friend. He followed her home and stayed.

“I studied the Book of Dogs and decided he was a Cardigan Welsh Corgi. Eventually we found his owners, but he didn’t want to stay home so they gave him to me,” Strickland said “I’ve had wonderful memories of him all my life.”

As an adult, she wanted a dog that could do dog sports, but that she could keep up with, and thought of her childhood buddy.

“I found my first CWC and haven’t looked back. Cardigans are a breed that fits my lifestyle.

The Georgia resident has owned, bred and exhibited Cardigan Welsh Corgis for over 20 years. She is dedicated to maintaining the temperament and health of the herding breed that captured her heart in her youth.

When she lost a beloved cardigan at age 14 to canine cognitive dysfunction, she wanted to do even more.

She volunteered to participate in the Dog Aging Project – a national study aimed at improving the longevity of all dogs. “When I heard about the project, I knew I wanted to help. They were looking for young dogs from the South East for the study, so I nominated my youngster and he was accepted into the program.

The goal of the Dog Aging Project is to understand how genes, lifestyle and environment influence aging. The study brings together a community of dogs, owners, veterinarians, researchers and volunteers.

“The Dog Aging Project has captured the imagination of dog owners around the world. Not just because the project’s findings could lead to more time with our beloved pets, but because what we learn will also be directly transferable to human health. Ultimately, this will lead to longer, healthier lives for humans and their canine companions,” said Dr. Audrey Ruple DVM, MS, PhD, associate professor at Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Tech.

Ruple is part of the Dog Aging Research Team, which includes representatives from 28 universities around the world.

As of mid-March, there were 35,000 volunteers in the Dog Aging Project Pack, who regularly report on the health, lifestyle and care of their dogs.

But more dogs are needed, Ruple said. The team is particularly interested in studying more intact dogs, large dogs, and dogs that live in the central and southern United States.

“All dogs are welcome: any size, breed, age and health condition! However, we can learn the most from dogs registered as puppies, ideally before they are spayed or spayed” “We can only register one dog per household, so it’s especially helpful for the owner to name the dog they know best,” Ruple said.

To contribute to the project, you can nominate a dog by going to dogagingproject.org and clicking Nominate Your Dog. You create a personal online portal and then receive an email invitation to complete the health and life experience survey.

The survey is in-depth and covers many topics including demographics, environment, behavior, diet, medications, and more. The survey is long, but you can take your time and complete it in sections, as long as it is submitted within six weeks. Participants are also encouraged to upload veterinary records for their dogs, and members of the project team can assist them if needed.

Strickland named her Cardigan, now almost 2 years old, with the official name Solstice Jalapeno Popper BCAT SCN SIN IT RATI, known to all as JeffJeff.

“He’s a very social dog and always ready to have fun. He’s young and just getting into dog sports, but he competes in AKC Scent Work, Fast CAT and Barn Hunt. He’s also got his AKC certificate Herding Instinct.

Participating in the project was easy and fun because it allows you to connect with other dog lovers across the country, Strickland said.

“The project has everything planned out to make it easy to do, and you’re updating as information becomes available,” she said. “The project team is easy to work with. They even have an area on their website called Dog Park where pack members can interact with each other and share their dogs. JeffJeff is pack member #36,017.”

The Dog Aging Project began to form in 2007 when Dr. Daniel Promislow of the University of Washington and Dr. Kate Creevy DVM of Texas A&M University collaborated on a study of causes of death in companion dogs. In 2013, they joined forces with Dr. Matt Kaeberlein PhD from the University of Washington, and the collaboration began in earnest.

In 2018, the National Institute on Aging, part of the National Institute on Health, funded his grant proposal for the Dog Aging Project. Creevy is now the project’s chief veterinarian, and Promislaw and Kaeberlein are co-directors.

“When the Dog Aging Project launched in November 2019, the response exceeded our wildest expectations. In one week, the project grew from 4,000 nominations to over 70,000, and we are now at over 92,000 Ruple said. “Thousands of outlets have covered the project, including The Washington Post, The New York Times, CNN and NBC Nightly News.”

The project’s work is centered on two objectives: to understand how biology, lifestyle and environment influence aging and to intervene to increase lifetime, the period of life spent without disease. Currently, there are five major research streams:

  • Defining frailty and successful aging in dogs.Unlike humans, there are no clearly defined parameters for determining how much a dog ages, no canine equivalent of the chair support test or grip strength, or predefined ranges by age for clinical chemistry measurements. To fill this gap, they are developing new metrics of canine aging, which will serve as the basis for a new veterinary specialty: canine gerontology.
  • Genetic analysis of aging in dogs. Genome sequence data from the 10,000 canine participants are integrated with health measures and behavioral traits to conduct comprehensive genome-wide association studies.
  • Systems biology of healthy aging in dogs. Identify molecular biological predictors of disease and longevity and develop a epigenetic clockwhich predicts the biological age of dogs.
  • TRIAD—Rapamycin Intervention Study. Conduct a large-scale trial of FDA-approved products rapamycin, a drug that increases lifespan and delays the negative effects of aging in mice. They are testing the drug’s effects on cognitive function, heart function, immunity and cancer incidence in 500 middle-aged dogs.
  • Canine Cognitive Health. To monitor the cognitive health of aging dogs through a variety of cognitive assessments as well as physiological and structural measures of brain health to understand the progression and correlates of canine cognitive dysfunction.

“Out of the Pack, we invite subsets of dogs to participate in more in-depth studies, such as the Genetic Study, TRIAD or Brain Health Study. We will select dogs to ensure variation, at the both genetically and geographically, and we will be looking for owners who are willing and able to participate in various research activities,” Ruple said.

“If a dog is invited to participate in an additional study, we give owners all the information they need to make an informed decision about whether or not to participate. If they don’t want to, that’s fine; they remain valued members of the Pack and will have the opportunity to participate in other activities in the future. “

Strickland said she encourages all dog lovers to contribute to the study in any way they can, Strickland said.

“If it helps our animals live longer, why not you? I want them to live forever and even if eternity is just a few more years, I will take it.

To join the project team, contact team@dogagingproject.org

More information is available at:

Website & Blog: https://dogagingproject.org/stories/

Video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M8QZWbRu0RQ&t=1s

The YouTube channel has video recaps of monthly pack appreciation events, which include interviews with our research team:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCprnBPHZ8VYgzVfIkP1H7dQ

The FAQs contain details about participation:

https://dogagingproject.zendesk.com/hc/en-us

]]>
AMERICAN KENNEL CLUB JOINS CALIFORNIA VETERINARY MEDICAL ASSOCIATION AND ANIMAL HEALTH INSTITUTE IN OPPOSING CALIFORNIA BILL AB 1881 https://codogfederation.org/american-kennel-club-joins-california-veterinary-medical-association-and-animal-health-institute-in-opposing-california-bill-ab-1881/ Mon, 18 Apr 2022 18:11:00 +0000 https://codogfederation.org/american-kennel-club-joins-california-veterinary-medical-association-and-animal-health-institute-in-opposing-california-bill-ab-1881/ NEW YORK, April 18, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — The American Kennel Club® (AKC), the world’s largest purebred dog registry and leading dog advocate, has partnered with the California Veterinary Medical Association (CVMA) and the Animal Health Institute (AHI) to make a joint public statement opposing the California Assembly Bill of 1881. The bill, billed as a […]]]>

NEW YORK, April 18, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — The American Kennel Club® (AKC), the world’s largest purebred dog registry and leading dog advocate, has partnered with the California Veterinary Medical Association (CVMA) and the Animal Health Institute (AHI) to make a joint public statement opposing the California Assembly Bill of 1881.

The bill, billed as a ‘bill of rights for dogs and cats,’ has several concerning elements and would seriously undermine the rights of pet owners to make appropriate health care decisions for their pets. and take the best possible care of their pets. Additionally, it has the potential to change the legal status of pets in Californiawhich could lead to unintended consequences and future litigation.

The American Kennel Club cares deeply about the welfare of all dogs,” said Sheila Goffe, Vice President of Government Relations, AKC. “We are pleased to join the California Veterinary Medical Association and the Animal Health Institute in sharing our concerns about this proposal, which could undermine the rights and responsibilities of pet owners to make care decisions. appropriate for their animals.”

The letter, sent to the author of the bill State Representative of California Michael Santiago and to the Assembly’s Business and Professions Committee, which examines the bill April 26calling for changes to the law and highlighting the concerns of pets and their owners.

The AKC, CVMA and AHI are organizations dedicated to ensuring the health, welfare and humane care of animals and to ensuring that pet owners understand the responsibilities of pet ownership. .

The full text of the letter can be viewed here.

About the American Kennel Club

Founded in 1884, the American Kennel Club is a nonprofit organization that maintains the world’s largest purebred dog registry and oversees the sport of purebred dogs in United States. The AKC is dedicated to maintaining the integrity of its registry, promoting the sport of purebred dogs, and breeding for type and function. With its more than 5,000 chartered and member clubs and affiliated organizations, the AKC champions the purebred dog as a family companion, advances canine health and welfare, strives to protect the rights of all dog owners and promotes responsible dog ownership. Over 22,000 competitions for AKC-registered purebred and mixed breed dogs are held each year under AKC rules and regulations, including conformation, agility, obedience, rallying, tracking , herding, lure racing, coonhound events, hunt tests, field and land dog tests. Organizations affiliated with the AKC include the AKC Humane Fund, AKC Canine Health Foundation, AKC Reunite, and AKC Museum of the Dog. AKC clubs comprise America’s largest lifesaving network. For more information, visit www.akc.org.

AKC, American Kennel Club, the American Kennel Club seal and design, and all related marks and logos are trademarks, registered trademarks, and service marks of American Kennel Club, Inc.

Become a fan of the American Kennel Club on Facebook and follow us on Twitter @AKCDogLovers

Quote

View original content: https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/the-american-kennel-club-joins-california-veterinary-medical-association-and-the-animal-health-institute-to-oppose – california-bill-ab-1881-301527295.html

SOURCE American Kennel Club

]]>
Keep ‘toxic’ chocolate away from your pets, warns the Kennel Club https://codogfederation.org/keep-toxic-chocolate-away-from-your-pets-warns-the-kennel-club/ Thu, 14 Apr 2022 15:45:30 +0000 https://codogfederation.org/keep-toxic-chocolate-away-from-your-pets-warns-the-kennel-club/ Keep Easter eggs away from your dogs this weekend, pet owners are being warned as vets point to the danger of toxic chocolate to pets and warn thousands could get sick The Kennel Club has warned dog owners to keep Easter chocolate away from their pets A dog protection organization expects a 54% increase in […]]]>

Keep Easter eggs away from your dogs this weekend, pet owners are being warned as vets point to the danger of toxic chocolate to pets and warn thousands could get sick

  • The Kennel Club has warned dog owners to keep Easter chocolate away from their pets
  • A dog protection organization expects a 54% increase in dog poisonings in April
  • Lakeland Terrier Bunty fell horribly ill after munching on Easter treats
  • Around half a million dogs may need urgent treatment after nibbling accidents

The Kennel Club has warned dog owners to keep ‘toxic’ Easter chocolate away from their pets – after a beloved terrier fell horribly ill after eating a treat.

The dog welfare organization expects to see a 54% increase in dog poisonings in April, the second highest of the year after Christmas.

These are the animals that sniff and nibble on their owner’s well-hidden chocolate before falling ill.

The Kennel Club has warned dog owners to keep ‘toxic’ Easter chocolate away from their pets – after beloved Lakeland Terrier Bunty became horribly ill after eating a treat

Over the next few days, half a million dogs could need urgent treatment after nibbling accidents, reports the Mirror.

It comes after Bunty, a cheeky six-year-old Lakeland Terrier, had a sickly nightmare when she put her paws on a whole chocolate brownie – which was baked as a delicious Easter treat.

Bunty’s owner, Ela Gardner from Birmingham, called her local pet hospital who advised her to bring Bunty in for emergency treatment as soon as possible.

Ela, 63, said: ‘I went out to the shops that day and thought I’d treat myself to a brownie from our local bakery.

The dog welfare organization expects to see a 54% increase in dog poisonings in April, the second highest of the year after Christmas (stock photo)

The dog welfare organization expects to see a 54% increase in dog poisonings in April, the second highest of the year after Christmas (stock photo)

‘I had left it in my bag on my desk and went to another room for just a few minutes – but was horrified when I returned to find an empty plastic bag and a trail of crumbs!

“I immediately started to panic as I know chocolate is toxic to dogs – I’m very concerned about leaving food and didn’t think Bunty would manage to get the brownie out of the bottom of my bag, which I thought left well out of reach.

PDSA Veterinary Nurse Nina Downing said: “Bunty’s case might have been a close call, but luckily her owner quickly contacted the PDSA and she was immediately brought to our Oldbury Pet Hospital. “

Why can’t dogs eat chocolate?

Chocolate contains a chemical called theobromine, which is toxic to dogs.

Even small amounts can cause vomiting, diarrhea, seizures, and heart problems.

The darker the chocolate, the higher the level of theobromine, and therefore the more toxic it is.

White chocolate, although it does not contain enough theobromine to cause toxicity, is fatty and full of sugar and may pose a potential risk of pancreatitis.

Even without the danger of toxicity, chocolate is not a healthy snack for dogs, causing obesity and poor health, so it is best avoided.

Source: Blue Cross

Bunty was given immediate treatment to make her sick safely, followed by medication to prevent her body from absorbing the remaining toxins.

A survey of 3,000 dog owners found that only 67% of them know to keep chocolate treats away from their dogs.

Bill Lambert, a canine health expert at The Kennel Club, said: “We want to remind all owners to keep a very close eye on their four-legged friends.

“Our furry companions can sniff out even the best hidden chocolate eggs and non-canine confectionery, as these disturbing new statistics show.

“As a society of dog lovers, we naturally want to include our pets in the festivities.

“However, to make sure Easter remains happy and safe for everyone, we want to make new and experienced dog owners aware of some things that pose a particular danger to dogs at this time of year.”

Vicky Wentworth, of Agria Pet Insurance, added: “Often with more chocolate, along with school holidays and unusual routines, it can be too easy for dogs to get hold of Easter eggs and boxes of chocolates.

‘Never underestimate how skilled a determined dog can be at getting a treat they love the smell of – we’re always amazed at the lengths some dogs go to to get what they want!

“So please keep chocolate or anything toxic to your pets out of their reach.”

Advertisement

]]>