Canine registry – Codogfederation http://codogfederation.org/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 22:05:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://codogfederation.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-71-120x120.png Canine registry – Codogfederation http://codogfederation.org/ 32 32 Graves Registry: Films that jostle in the night | Columnists https://codogfederation.org/graves-registry-films-that-jostle-in-the-night-columnists/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 10:29:00 +0000 https://codogfederation.org/graves-registry-films-that-jostle-in-the-night-columnists/ I thought I might hijack this week from the real life horror shows that happen every day and recommend some thrillers that Hollywood has conjured up to scare us. You may notice that I failed to mention the classic horror films produced by Universal Studios in the 1930s and 1940s. It was not out of […]]]>

I thought I might hijack this week from the real life horror shows that happen every day and recommend some thrillers that Hollywood has conjured up to scare us. You may notice that I failed to mention the classic horror films produced by Universal Studios in the 1930s and 1940s. It was not out of disrespect on my part. I just thought I’d offer a few titles that might not be so familiar.

It is, after all, the season and who doesn’t like a good scare once in a while? So, in no particular order:

“The spiral staircase” (1946). There’s been a series of murders in a small town in Vermont. The victims are all women with some sort of disability. Helen (Dorothy McGuire, in a beautifully nuanced performance) hasn’t said a word since she was a child when she witnessed her parents die in a fire. She works for the Warren family in a secluded mansion that could be a monument to Gothic sensibility.

Elderly, sick, and grumpy Mrs. Warren (Ethel Barrymore) worries for Helen’s safety, especially since the return of her wayward son, Stephen (Gordon Oliver). The murders always seem to coincide with his visits.

It’s the quintessential peril during a raging thunderstorm in an old scary movie. Director Robert Siodmak has masterfully combined his roots in German Expressionism with American commercialism, creating atmosphere and menace with shadows and darkness.

It’s very hard to resist the call of a warning to Helen that someone is waiting for her at the bottom of that spiral staircase.

“Hush… Hush, sweet Charlotte” (1964). Faded Southern beauty Charlotte Hollis (Bette Davis) has isolated herself in her rundown plantation home since her married lover had an unfortunate encounter with a meat cleaver. The general consensus was that Charlotte used it, although no one was ever convicted of committing the grisly murder.

Her home is her shelter from whispers and pointing fingers and the state intends to tear it down to build a highway. Charlotte enlists the help of her long-absent cousin, Miriam (Olivia de Havilland), to save the old house. Miriam exudes a polished, sophisticated air like a heady, expensive perfume, but Charlotte’s longtime housekeeper, Velma (Agnes Moorehead), doesn’t trust her as much as she might toss one of the white columns adorning the facade of the manor. Velma may be a little careless, but she’s a good judge of character. Or lack thereof.

The film was a follow-up (not a sequel) to “What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?” (1962), a surprise box office hit that proved that even actresses with decades in their rearview mirrors could still sell tickets. “Charlotte” was to have starred the same two ladies who featured in “Baby Jane,” but Joan Crawford and Davis never got along and Crawford eventually quit the production and was replaced by Davis’ longtime girlfriend Olivia. de Havilland.

In many ways, “Charlotte” is a lot more fun than “Baby Jane.” It’s more visceral and less claustrophobic. Director Robert Aldrich shared Robert Siodmak’s affinity for shadows and mood and he also makes the most of a thunderstorm.

Mrs. Davis, sporting an accent you could cut with the aforementioned cleaver, is beautifully exaggerated, and she is ably encouraged by de Havilland, Moorehead (who was nominated for an Oscar), Joseph Cotton, Victor Buono, and especially Mary Astor, in a cameo appearance as a woman who welcomes the prospect of death as the ultimate end to her troubled life.

“The Haunting” (1963). It’s not to be confused with the awful 1999 version of Shirley Jackson’s disturbing novel or Netflix’s bloated 2018 parody.

It’s a cerebral horror story in the best sense of the word. It’s also one of the scariest movies I’ve ever seen. There are no werewolves, vampires, or other assorted monsters roaming the halls of Hill House. There is no blood running down the walls. There is, however, for the small group chosen for their susceptibility to paranormal activity, a palpable sense of dread buried in the dark stone structure.

Julie Harris, a standout actress who specialized in characters with a tenuous foothold on reality, played Eleanor Lance. Eleanor spent years caring for her crippled mother while her own life went by. The chance to participate in an experiment into the tangible existence of the supernatural led by Dr. John Markway (Richard Johnson) is the key that will unlock the door that has kept her caged. She opens it revengefully.

The film is scrupulously bloodless, but you may never again trust the hand you’re really holding in the dark.

Halloween Honorable Mentions: “The Night of the Hunter” (1955), “Train to Busan” (2016), “The Uninvited” (1944), “Fright Night” (1985), “Hush” (2016), “An American Werewolf in London” (1981), “Frenzy” by Alfred Hitchcock (1972), “The Innocents” (1961), “Bram Stoker’s Dracula” (1992), “Poltergeist” (1982), “The Howling” (1981 ), “Sleepy Hollow” (1999) and “Dog Soldiers” (2002).

Be sure to close the curtains and dim the lights.

One final note: For those of you who thought his divorce from Angelina Jolie was the biggest mess Brad Pitt had ever gotten himself into, check out “Bullet Train.”

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Graves Registry: A racist heir to the crown? | Columnists https://codogfederation.org/graves-registry-a-racist-heir-to-the-crown-columnists/ Wed, 05 Oct 2022 12:52:00 +0000 https://codogfederation.org/graves-registry-a-racist-heir-to-the-crown-columnists/ People who close their eyes to reality simply invite their own destruction, and anyone who insists on remaining in a state of innocence long after that innocence is dead turns into a monster. –James Baldwin We hear many words tossed about today that have acquired new meanings. “Woke” was something you did in the morning. […]]]>

People who close their eyes to reality simply invite their own destruction, and anyone who insists on remaining in a state of innocence long after that innocence is dead turns into a monster. –James Baldwin

We hear many words tossed about today that have acquired new meanings. “Woke” was something you did in the morning. The opposite, I suppose, would be asleep. Nothing changes much when you sleep. Nothing progresses, and assuming you’re not prone to nightmares, you can forget about some of the more uncomfortable parts of life and just…dream.

The original definition of the word suggests an awareness of the changing world around you. Woke is a transition from the helpless, comfortable stillness of sleep, so it’s no wonder curators have adapted it into something potentially menacing. It became the new “Red,” the right-wing whistle to those who dared to undermine their bigoted notion of patriotism in the 1950s.

You have to wonder if there are small contingents of political hacks in seedy back rooms whose job it is to dream up these silly modes of attack. I use the word stupid because on what other planet than where the current Republican Party has set up housekeeping would a word synonymous with a state of consciousness be considered dangerous.

Merriam-Webster defines the word “woke”, in its new slang incarnation, as being “aware of and actively attentive to important facts and issues (especially issues of racial and social justice)”.

And there, as Hamlet said so well, is the real problem.

The woke hysteria has attached itself to another perceived facet of conservative peril in America. Not so much with a word as with an acronym: the dreaded CRT.

Critical Race Theory is an academic discipline that, to my knowledge, has never been taught in public schools. To hear the outcry from the right, however, one would think that teachers were instructing their students in the intricacies of animal abuse.

Opponents of the CRT honestly believe that an outright refusal to accept this country’s abysmal history of racism is consistent with true patriotism. “Gone with the Wind” should be the historic record, not “12 Years a Slave”. It is a triumph of mythology over truth.

I don’t even know to what extent they recognize bigotry. It’s not always the spectacle of a flaming cross or hooligans in sheets.

Our former president began his campaign raising the specter of “Mexican rapists” and recently called the Taiwanese wife of Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell “the Chinese-loving Coco Chow.” He and his real estate magnate father were both charged with housing discrimination by the Justice Department in 1973.

Asked about his history of obviously bigoted actions and words, he told a reporter that there was no one less racist than him. Guess he needs the flaming cross.

The truly tragic part of his legacy is the realization that the Republican Party can benefit from principles of rejection like tolerance and acceptance. The tactic is not so different from their appeasement of southern white voters who have been infuriated by Lyndon Johnson’s Great Society national programs which, among its other laudable goals, abolished inequality in the United States.

Bigotry and racism certainly polluted the air in America long before our former CEO clouded the horizon. If it hadn’t existed, the opponents of the CRT might be right. The former president’s unfiltered bigotry has fanned the embers, and men like Florida Governor Ron DeSantis ensure the flame of intolerance always burns bright.

DeSantis, who is currently traversing an estimated $100 billion worth of debris in his state from Hurricane Ian, is suddenly very receptive to federal aid when he adamantly opposes it after the Hurricane Sandy destroyed New York and New Jersey in 2012. Hypocrisy, your name is Ron.

He’s the kind of politician who doesn’t breathe without thinking about the most self-serving direction in which to breathe out. A base call from his base was most likely the motive for a stunt he engineered that sent about 50 Venezuelan migrants to Martha’s Vineyard with bogus promises of work for them. It’s almost as if Ian is God’s own rebuke for his appalling cruelty, but I’m sure DeSanti’s cocky head, towering more than 5ft off the ground, doesn’t bow while his poll count is in rise. The incident will undoubtedly be written off the history books in Florida schools.

No one ever recognizes anything by denying its existence. And that’s really what the rabid adversaries of the CRT are determined to do. They don’t want children taught a particularly unpleasant aspect of their country’s history. It’s not so much about frosting the cake as about not baking it at all.

Their determination to banish the issue of racism from classroom discourse betrays the fact that on some level they are aware of its shame.

There is also an underlying fear component here. It is a fear that the day will come when, surprisingly, they themselves will be members of a minority in the United States. With this realization, it must be terrifying to imagine that they could be victims of the same abuses that other minorities have suffered throughout our history.

The denial of the insidious importance of racism in the history of our country is, in itself, an aspect of racism. Nothing is more certain than the warning that those who forget the past are doomed to repeat it.

Denial never alters the truth, it only compromises the future.

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BlackRock buys 130-unit apartment building for $24.2 million https://codogfederation.org/blackrock-buys-130-unit-apartment-building-for-24-2-million/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 11:08:03 +0000 https://codogfederation.org/blackrock-buys-130-unit-apartment-building-for-24-2-million/ By Catherine Sweeney Over the past few months, Tacoma has seen a significant number of multi-family transactions. Most recently, a 130-apartment building in the northwest part of town was purchased by BlackRock for $24.2 million, or about $186,154 per square foot. The property was sold by an entity affiliated with Yuksel Inc. and Maimei Keremujiang […]]]>

By Catherine Sweeney

Over the past few months, Tacoma has seen a significant number of multi-family transactions. Most recently, a 130-apartment building in the northwest part of town was purchased by BlackRock for $24.2 million, or about $186,154 per square foot. The property was sold by an entity affiliated with Yuksel Inc. and Maimei Keremujiang of Kent, according to public records filed with Pierce County.

The building, also known as Tanara Villa Apartments, is located at 6322 N. 26th Street. Built in 1969, the two-story building is intended for people 55 and older.

The property offers a mix of unit types, with rents ranging from $1,125 to $1,325 per month. The seniors’ apartment community also has a variety of amenities for tenants, including community gathering places, a dog park, and walking areas.

A number of retail outlets including Safeway and Rite Aid are also close to the property. Additionally, the property is a short drive to Point Defiance Park and Beach.

Overall, Tacoma has seen many multi-family properties change hands in recent quarters. According to previous Registry reports, in one such sale recorded on August 3, a 111-apartment building in Tacoma was purchased by an entity affiliated with Tacoma Apts. LLC for $46.2 million, or approximately $416,216 per unit. The property is located at 3118 6th Avenue and was sold by Tacoma-based Affinity Real Estate Management.

Earlier in June, Goodman Real Estate sold Coventry Court IV Apartments, a building with 100 apartments. The building is located at 908 76th Street Court East and sold for $21.15 million, or about $211,500 per square foot.

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Plum Southern gift and wedding registry shop gets new owner – Reuters https://codogfederation.org/plum-southern-gift-and-wedding-registry-shop-gets-new-owner-reuters/ Sat, 03 Sep 2022 13:01:36 +0000 https://codogfederation.org/plum-southern-gift-and-wedding-registry-shop-gets-new-owner-reuters/ Plum Southern gift and wedding registry shop has a new owner Posted at 9:00 a.m. on Saturday, September 3, 2022 Peggie Scott, owner of gift and wedding registry shop Plum Southern, recently sold the business to Kristin Sullivan. Sullivan, a native of Naples, Florida, has been a destination wedding planner for over 25 years. When […]]]>

Plum Southern gift and wedding registry shop has a new owner

Posted at 9:00 a.m. on Saturday, September 3, 2022

Peggie Scott, owner of gift and wedding registry shop Plum Southern, recently sold the business to Kristin Sullivan.

Sullivan, a native of Naples, Florida, has been a destination wedding planner for over 25 years. When she saw Plum Southern for sale, she thought it would be a good choice.

“I’m looking to grow the wedding industry in LaGrange,” Sullivan said. “I do planning, bridal retreats and have my own retail line. I thought it might be a good opportunity to expand my own retail line into the store as well.

Scott decided to put Plum Southern up for sale in April 2022 as she decided she was ready to enter the world of retirement with her husband and dog, Pandy.

According to Sullivan, Scott plans to stay at Plum Southern through the holiday season until he retires in early January to be with his grandchildren.

Sullivan said LaGrange is a perfect fit and everyone has been nice so far.

“Everyone here is so nice. I was telling my friends and family that this reminded me of a Hallmark movie,” she said. “Everyone knows each other, everyone is nice, everyone is helpful.”

Items in the store currently include a journal to help brides stay organized, a bag called Hip Betty that helps wedding planners carry over 200 items, and planning cards that count down the last 30 days to the wedding day. .

“During the pandemic, as you can imagine, all marriages have come to a standstill, like the world has come to a standstill,” Sullivan said. “I used to be constantly on the go, so maybe 10 years ago I developed a retail line of items that I thought would be useful and informative for brides and grooms. wedding planners.

Sullivan said she was very excited about a bridal show in January 2023 where she collaborates with An Affair To Remember, Del’avant Event Center and the Beauty Bar.

“We’re going to do it in January because most brides get engaged over Christmas and New Years,” she said.

Sullivan also said she would host a virtual retreat in January alongside the launch of a bridal subscription box, with box items being sold at Plum Southern.

The retreat is for people who are getting engaged, feeling overwhelmed and don’t know where to start planning their wedding.

“The retreats were created to take the hassle out of wedding planning and allow couples to enter into a good holistic mental state,” Sullivan said.

Sullivan knows that taking over from Scott means she has big shoes to fill.

“I want to honor Peggie and all that she has done over the past 15 years with Plum Southern,” Sullivan said. “She is an icon in the community and part of the story of so many people. I hope to carry on that legacy and tradition.

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HM Land Registry to make home buying easier through digitization https://codogfederation.org/hm-land-registry-to-make-home-buying-easier-through-digitization/ Thu, 01 Sep 2022 10:44:12 +0000 https://codogfederation.org/hm-land-registry-to-make-home-buying-easier-through-digitization/ Credit: Gerd Altmann/Pixabay HM Land Registry plans to use more data and digital processing to facilitate the process of buying a home in England and Wales, according to a recently published policy document. In Strategy 2022+, the department says buying a home is “unnecessarily complicated, opaque, stressful and too prone to failure” and that data […]]]>

Credit: Gerd Altmann/Pixabay

HM Land Registry plans to use more data and digital processing to facilitate the process of buying a home in England and Wales, according to a recently published policy document.

In Strategy 2022+, the department says buying a home is “unnecessarily complicated, opaque, stressful and too prone to failure” and that data and digital can help mitigate this. It wants to automate about half of its simplest apps by 2023-24, allowing them to switch in seconds, and then up to 70% of all ownership changes by 2024-25.

The document notes that in 2021, the sale of an average home took 49% more than in 2007 and more than a quarter of transactions do not complete. HM Land Registry is working to develop a fully digital process for buying and selling in conjunction with other organisations, with all of its sales and purchasing support services provided through its online portal and direct system-to-system connections , including mobile applications. It already accepts e-signed property transfers and mortgages and supports a standard digital identity verification service, so no paper forms are required.

During registration, the organization has put a new system online that will be able to accept almost all types of applications by the end of this year. It has also restructured nearly 60% of its data to be machine-readable, including through the use of natural language processing to extract data from unstructured text. It is introducing a new case processing system and has introduced a document comparison tool that identifies differences between document versions, saving case workers time.

“After-sales registrations take too long to process and the digitization of our services and working methods still needs to grow,” Chief Executive Simon Hayes writes in the strategy foreword. “We are still building a fully resilient and flexible land registration system in a market where demand is volatile and world events unpredictable.”

The organization also plans to improve the availability of its data, including freely available open data. This includes providing instant access to the local land change register for all of England and Wales by the end of 2025 via a service on GOV.UK launched in 2018 which currently contains data from 47 local authorities.

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What if you can’t afford anything on a wedding registry? https://codogfederation.org/what-if-you-cant-afford-anything-on-a-wedding-registry/ Fri, 26 Aug 2022 21:03:17 +0000 https://codogfederation.org/what-if-you-cant-afford-anything-on-a-wedding-registry/ Saving Money / Relationships Vasil Dimitrov / iStock.com We all know it’s rude to attend a wedding without giving the couple a gift, but what if you can’t afford anything on the wedding registry? Maybe the couple have expensive tastes and all the registry items are out of your budget, or maybe you waited until […]]]>
Vasil Dimitrov / iStock.com

We all know it’s rude to attend a wedding without giving the couple a gift, but what if you can’t afford anything on the wedding registry? Maybe the couple have expensive tastes and all the registry items are out of your budget, or maybe you waited until the last minute and the only remaining registry items are costing you too much.

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Whatever the case, it’s important to know your options so you don’t come off as a rude wedding guest. Here’s what etiquette experts and wedding pros say to do in this situation.

Pool your money with other customers for a group gift

“In an ideal world, the bride and groom will choose a wide enough selection of goods that most people can afford something in the registry, but of course there is always the possibility that the remaining items or items will be out of order. your budget,” said Julia Estève Boyd, The label consultant. “I would suggest trying to find another guest or guests who would be willing to split the cost of a larger gift. That way the couple gets something from the registry and you don’t pay the full price of the article. “

Give them an experience instead

An alternative to buying the registry could be to offer the couple a one-of-a-kind experience.

“Give a couple spa day, a guided tour, etc., and say you wanted to get something a little different that they can enjoy after the wedding and also remember you,” said Esteve Boyd.

Purchase a gift of your choice that is not in the registry

Just because a couple provides a wedding registry doesn’t mean you have to buy a gift there.

“The registry is a guideline, not a required contribution to attend the event,” said Jodi RR Smith of Mannersmith Etiquette Consulting. “Use the registry as a guide and pick something that matches the couple’s tastes.”

If you don’t know the couple well and aren’t sure what to gift, Angie Allison, Master Etiquette Trainer and Founder of Daily protocolrecommend browsing the wedding website to find out what they might like.

“Perhaps an idea can be sparked for a personal gift that is not on their registry, such as pet sitting or pottery lessons, or a monetary donation for a cause close to their hearts” , she said.

If you are purchasing a gift that is not on the registry, you may want to include a note explaining why you chose an alternative.

“There’s always room for honesty,” Esteve Boyd said. “Give a gift of your choice and say there were no more gifts left on the registry in your budget, so you’ve selected something you hope they’ll like. [This] won’t be unwelcome – at least it shouldn’t be.

However, if you don’t feel comfortable giving an explanation, you don’t have to.

“There’s also the option of choosing a gift of your own without giving an explanation,” Esteve Boyd said. “After all, you wouldn’t bring a hostess gift and announce that you can’t afford anything more expensive!”

Give them a thoughtful gift card

“If you’ve waited too long and options are limited in the registry, a gift card to the store they checked in is acceptable,” said Mona Zegarelli, an expert on modern etiquette and financial responsibility and author of “The Hopeful Hostess.” “Use an amount that fits your budget.

“If you’re giving a gift card, it’s best to have a real gift card and put it in a nice store-bought card, and bring it with you to the wedding,” she continued. “Most cases will have a box or basket for the cards.”

Money can also be an acceptable gift

“[Giving] cash is becoming more and more popular in the United States post-COVID,” said Maryanne Parker of Manor of Manners. “In many cultures, the cash option is widely accepted — and preferred — because the new couple can be flexible in their use.”

If you donate money, you are free to donate an amount you are comfortable with.

It’s okay if you really can’t afford to give anything

If you are going through a difficult time financially, you may not give the couple a gift. This shouldn’t deter you from attending the wedding.

“If you’re in a situation where a gift just isn’t possible, chances are the bride and groom are aware of your situation,” Zegarelli said. “They invited you to be part of their day, so go ahead!” Bring a cute card and write a sweet memory or message to the couple that they can cherish. Your best gift is to be at the wedding and be part of the day.

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About the Author

Gabrielle joined GOBankingRates in 2017 and brings with her a decade of experience in the journalism industry. Prior to joining the team, she was a staff writer-reporter for People Magazine and People.com. His work has also appeared on E! Online, Us Weekly, Patch, Sweety High and Discover Los Angeles, and she’s been featured on “Good Morning America” ​​as a celebrity news expert.

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Do you have farm animals in town? A mandatory register may be for you https://codogfederation.org/do-you-have-farm-animals-in-town-a-mandatory-register-may-be-for-you/ Wed, 27 Jul 2022 12:05:00 +0000 https://codogfederation.org/do-you-have-farm-animals-in-town-a-mandatory-register-may-be-for-you/ At a time when there is an emphasis on equal rights, even animals – from dogs and chickens to goats, horses and even therapy animals – and their owners must be taken into account. That was one of the conclusions of the city’s planning and development committee meeting on Tuesday. After discussing and debating what […]]]>

At a time when there is an emphasis on equal rights, even animals – from dogs and chickens to goats, horses and even therapy animals – and their owners must be taken into account.

That was one of the conclusions of the city’s planning and development committee meeting on Tuesday.

After discussing and debating what constitutes a nuisance, how to enforce restrictions, and which animal species should or should not be allowed in the city, the group covered a range of options and repercussions.

The animals prevailed, for the most part. In the end, the group agreed to come up with a recommendation to use the resolution drafted by City Manager Rachael Tabelski, plus some edits. This will go to City Council for consideration and possible vote. A public hearing will be held before a final decision is made, committee chair Duane Preston said.

“We are only making a few recommendations to the city council. At this point, the public hearing will be open to anyone who wishes to come and express their concerns,” Preston said. “So they have to hold a public hearing. Those who have animals who would like to attend can come and give their opinion to the municipal council. »

turner_and_kid_goats.jpgJill Turner and her neighbor on Burke Drive, Teresa Potrzebowski, each think they have a valid argument for one side or the other of the question. They disagree on whether Turner’s goats should remain on his property.

Turner told the Batavian previously that when she moved to the West End, there were no laws regarding her four goats. Her daughters spend time with the goats, one is in 4-H and the other daughter uses the animal for therapy, Turner said. Moreover, she does not think they are destructive or threatening to her neighbors as some have claimed.

That’s not Potrzebowski’s experience, she said ahead of Tuesday’s meeting. When she moved in, there were no goats, and “I wouldn’t have moved in if there had been,” she says. There is noise, bad smells and goats constantly coming out of their little shelter, she says. Turner also has chickens and ducks, and all three types of farm animals come to his yard.

“I came home bringing groceries and two big ones came into my garage,” she said.

Goats ate neighbors’ flowers and relieved themselves on their properties, she said.

“It smells like you live next to a farm,” she said.

Councilman John Canale raised the issue at a recent council meeting, based on complaints from residents about these goats. He attended the planning and development meeting but would not comment because he will have to vote on a resolution in the future and lives in the neighborhood, he said.

Committee member Matt Gray did his own research on “a number of towns and cities in the same boat” and found that many of those municipalities had made the decision to restrict animals.

“I found a lot of them leaning the same way we do,” he said.

About 17 out of 25 cities had restrictions, particularly on roosters, Gray said. He suggested adding them to a list of banned animals in the city. This raised further questions about if animals are allowed, how many should be allowed? What measures would be put in place to ensure proper enforcement when restrictions are breached?

david_beatty.jpg“The city would be responsible for a lot of the enforcement,” said member David Beatty. “I think whatever we recommend, the app is the most important thing. How do you apply it? How do you get cooperation from people who own animals? How problematic would that be? »

At one point, he offered to not allow any animals in town.

“There would be an uprising,” Beatty said.

Code Enforcement Officer Doug Randall explained that a law cannot affect only one segment of the population. It has to cover everyone, he said. Currently, however, a dog owner can receive repeated tickets for their dog barking continuously if the problem has not been addressed.

For a goat?

“No tickets. We don’t have a law for that,” Randall said.

About an hour later, the committee agreed to pass a resolution with the additions of limiting chickens to six, banning roosters from being kept in the town, and requiring town residents to register their animals before a certain date, to be determined by council whether to adopt the recommendation or not be permitted to keep the animal on his city property. Registering animals will allow people who already have chickens, goats and the like to keep them, and should make it easier to track who has what and where, Randall said.

The resolution “prohibits persons from owning, bringing, possessing, keeping, harboring or feeding any farm animals, cloven-hoofed animals, equines or poultry, including but not limited to , cattle, horses, sheep, goats, pigs, pigs, llamas, alpacas. , ducks, turkeys, geese, feral cats, ponies, donkeys, mules or any other farm or wild animal within the city limits. »

Exceptions include:

  • Chickens, as long as they are properly housed, do not accumulate droppings or cause odor or an unsightly or unsafe condition. The addition, if approved, would limit them to six.
  • Harborage, including transportation to and from race tracks and all associated grounds.
  • Special events with the approval of an event request.
  • Animals in transit in the city.
  • Transportation to and from veterinary hospitals/clinics including short term boarding for medical procedures/conditions.
  • No person shall permit the accumulation of animal and/or poultry excrement on any property resulting in a foul odor or unsightly condition which makes travel or residence in the vicinity uncomfortable, or which attracts flies or pests. other animal insects, thereby creating an unsanitary condition and may facilitate the spread of diseases which endanger the comfort and rest of the public.

The registration obligation would concern people who already have farm animals on their property. If they don’t register an animal by the deadline, it will have to leave.

Potrzebowski doesn’t want trouble with any neighbors, she said, but the recommendation didn’t fulfill her wish not to have to care for animals at all.

“It defeats the purpose of having to register them,” she said.

Top photo: Planning and Development Committee members Matt Gray, left, David Beatty and Chairman Duane Preston discuss the possibilities of what to do with farm animals kept in the city on Tuesday evening. File photo of Jill Turner, pictured with one of her daughters in front, is a town resident with goats, and some of her neighbors have complained they don’t want the smell and noise created by goats, chickens and other farm animals. David Beatty, a member of the committee, argues in favor of restricting, if not banning, farm animals from city properties. Photos by Joanne Beck.

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Acceptance of Crossbreed Canine Registry at Medical Research Conference Sets Stage for Further Collaboration – VetSurgeon News – VetSurgeon https://codogfederation.org/acceptance-of-crossbreed-canine-registry-at-medical-research-conference-sets-stage-for-further-collaboration-vetsurgeon-news-vetsurgeon/ Mon, 18 Jul 2022 11:45:13 +0000 https://codogfederation.org/acceptance-of-crossbreed-canine-registry-at-medical-research-conference-sets-stage-for-further-collaboration-vetsurgeon-news-vetsurgeon/ RCVS Knowledge and Amplitude Clinical Outcomes Celebrates Acceptance of a Virtual Poster on Its Canine Crossbreed Registry at the National Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROM) Research Conference, Paving the Way for Greater Collaboration Between human and veterinary researchers in the future. RCVS Knowledge launched the Canine Crossbreed Registry on the Amplitude pro registry platform last year. […]]]>

RCVS Knowledge and Amplitude Clinical Outcomes Celebrates Acceptance of a Virtual Poster on Its Canine Crossbreed Registry at the National Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROM) Research Conference, Paving the Way for Greater Collaboration Between human and veterinary researchers in the future.

RCVS Knowledge launched the Canine Crossbreed Registry on the Amplitude pro registry platform last year.

The automated registry, the first of its kind in veterinary medicine, allows the profession to assess the success of surgical techniques and practitioners to compare their performance.

In June, RCVS Knowledge had a poster detailing the registry’s purpose, impact and aspirations accepted at the PROMs Research Conference, which until now has generally only accepted submissions from the field of human medicine.

This, according to Amplitude, marks the first step in sharing information about running registries designed to identify best practices in the care and treatment of animals and people.

Chris Gush, Executive Director of RCVS Knowledge, said, “RCVS Knowledge is proud to lead the development of clinical audits and registries to support the veterinary professions on their journey to continuous improvement in the care they provide.

“Registries are essential to help the professions understand first-hand information about our patients with certain conditions, both individually and as a group, contextualizing it with information from their owners and, over time, to increase our understanding of this condition.”

PS: While you’re here, take a moment to view our latest vacancies for vets.

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NY honors long-standing businesses with historic registry https://codogfederation.org/ny-honors-long-standing-businesses-with-historic-registry/ Thu, 07 Jul 2022 11:30:00 +0000 https://codogfederation.org/ny-honors-long-standing-businesses-with-historic-registry/ BUFFALO, NY – Owning a business isn’t easy, especially during a pandemic and the current economic climate. Today, 100 long-standing businesses in New York that have remained in business for decades are honored and have been added to the state’s new Historic Business Preservation Registry. One such company, in Allegany County, has been serving customers […]]]>

BUFFALO, NY – Owning a business isn’t easy, especially during a pandemic and the current economic climate.

Today, 100 long-standing businesses in New York that have remained in business for decades are honored and have been added to the state’s new Historic Business Preservation Registry.

One such company, in Allegany County, has been serving customers for over a century.

A menu favorite that restaurant co-owner Mike Raptis says has kept Texas Hot in Wellsville serving customers since November 1921, just over 100 years ago.

“There happens to be a photo we enlarged of the original owners,” Mike said. “It’s George Raptis on the left and Jim Rigas on the right.”

And at the front of the restaurant, the grill, where passersby can glimpse a story in the making.

“Better than being in the back with no windows,” Mike said. “You can see what’s going on and you also enjoy your working day here.”

In recognition of its century-old tradition, Texas Hot was recently listed on the state’s newest Historic Business Preservation Registry.

He was one of 100 designated across the state, so far.

“It’s a wonderful honor to receive,” said Mike. “It’s where people come, people talk, people like to socialize.”

Mike’s father, second-generation owner Jim Raptis, 92, took over the business from his father, before handing it over to Mike in the 1980s.

Jim, equally proud of the state recognition, rejoices that the company has come a long way from humble beginnings to now being part of the state’s legacy.

“We sell about 5,500 hot dogs a week, out of six,” Jim said. “So we’re quite proud of the fact that we come from almost nothing.”

“When you walk in there, it’s like stepping back in time,” said New York State Senator George Borrello. “I just think it’s a testament to that family and the hard work.”

Borrello recently presented the restaurant with the distinction. He says state lawmakers passed a law a few years ago creating the Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation Registry to recognize businesses that have survived over time.

“Not only are these milestones, but this is an incredible achievement for businesses that are not only surviving, but thriving here in New York State,” Borrello said.

Mike is now grooming the fourth generation to take over the centuries-old tradition.

“It just makes you smile knowing that we’ve been around for so long, done such a wonderful job, and continue to give 100%,” Mike said.

The restaurant is hosting a centennial celebration July 7-9 and all events are free.

This was just the first round for the registry, as the state seeks to expand it.

To be considered, the company must be at least 50 years old and be nominated by an elected head of state.

Other companies on the register include Fancher Chair in Jamestown, C&S Companies in Syracuse, Jackson’s Bakery in Rochester, and B. Lodge & Company in Albany.

To see the full list of businesses on the list, Click here.

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Historic Register status conferred on Jones School https://codogfederation.org/historic-register-status-conferred-on-jones-school/ Mon, 04 Jul 2022 14:12:00 +0000 https://codogfederation.org/historic-register-status-conferred-on-jones-school/ June 11, 2022 Passing Mount Airy Secondary School along North South Street, one notices the walls, sidewalks and signage of a typical educational institution – but one probably doesn’t realize that a thriving business lies also within its limits. On a recent morning at the Blue Bear Cafe as the school year drew to a […]]]>

Passing Mount Airy Secondary School along North South Street, one notices the walls, sidewalks and signage of a typical educational institution – but one probably doesn’t realize that a thriving business lies also within its limits.

On a recent morning at the Blue Bear Cafe as the school year drew to a close, senior Ocean Davis was putting the finishing touches on a fruit smoothie after serving cookies and brownies to a grateful recipient. Chances are another customer will soon order a cup of freshly brewed latte from the student-run business.

The coffee at the Blue Bear Cafe is reputed to be so good that teacher Ashley Pyles did not hesitate to compare what the children prepare to that offered by an international chain of cafes:

“They make the best coffee, hands down, on Starbucks every day,” Pyles said proudly.

In addition to a variety of coffees – including Frappé, Latte and Americano – there are several flavors of fruit smoothies, various sweet treats including bundt cakes, snacks, hot chocolate, cider and more Again.

The Blue Bear Cafe menu additionally includes specialty drinks featuring what has apparently become a local sensation, bubble teas.

Yet perhaps the best product served up there is success – cooked up daily by apron-wearing student entrepreneurs who gain valuable business experience during the school year that can help them in a career.

“It’s never about coffee,” said Polly Long, Workforce Initiatives Coordinator, when discussing the mission involved, or for that matter caffeine, the boosting ingredient in this popular drink. .

“It’s all about skills,” added Long, a longtime employee of the school system who is credited with making the on-campus enterprise a reality.

“A student-run cafe has been Polly Long’s dream for years,” reads a statement prepared in conjunction with the Blue Bear Cafe program receiving special recognition from the municipal government at a recent council meeting. This statement also refers to the role that “extraordinarily talented students” played in its success.

The cafe, which started in 2019, aims to provide targeted youth with basic life skills training and create a pathway to employment in the service sector.

For example, junior Jennifer Griffin has her sights set on becoming a pastry chef.

The Blue Bear Cafe operates through the school’s Professional Studies Program Unit and is overseen by teachers Jennifer Gentry and Ashley Pyles in addition to Long.

“Jennifer is kind of our pastry chef,” Gentry said of Griffin’s inescapable role in the operation.

Approximately 10 students are enrolled in the program in any given academic year. They also attend regular classes in addition to working a set number of hours for coffee, constituting class periods. It is open from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. during school terms.

Student Innovators

The Blue Bear Cafe occupies a strategic space in the high school’s media center, which provides an inviting setting to enjoy a drink or snack that arguably rivals that of any cafe on the planet. The surroundings are pleasantly lit by large bay windows overlooking North South Street.

The place was fitted out with the help of Goodwill Industries, Long said, which helped provide start-up funds to acquire new furniture and fixtures.

It is tastefully decorated with walls painted in a light brown and olive green color scheme, printed with phrases such as “serve kindness a cup of time” and inspirational words such as “imagine”, “create”, ” inspire” and others.

The students respond by constantly adding new drinks and have even developed a website to promote the company. A Blue Bear Cafe Facebook page is available to facilitate ordering.

The school’s spotless kitchen is located in a side room, near a counter where students consult library materials as part of a harmonious dual existence between the two schools. A gift shop specializing in student-made products is also located at the cafe, offering items such as mugs and t-shirts and handcrafted items from local entrepreneurs.

In addition to the culinary skills honed by young people, other abilities are learned that they can apply to many other career endeavors besides a café itself.

These include leadership, communication, organizational skills and teamwork, as well as the actual duties of dealing with the public to take orders, give change from a cash register and process orders by credit card.

“They see it in real time,” Long said of the impression left on those in the outside world who can see education applied to real business. The students involved are a mix of upper and lower classes who provide a seamless transition with knowledge transfer as they come and go.

“They basically learn how to run a business on their own,” Pyles observed.

While the café is closed for the summer, before resuming operations with the start of the new school year, it has been popular with members of the public who can call in and take orders on campus.

In other cases, large orders will even be delivered to customers.

“We’re in the dark,” Long said of the cost of this service given soaring gas prices. “What we are trying to do is break even, with all profits going directly to the company.

“We use some of that money to take them (students) on field trips,” Gentry advised.

Long hopes to expand the Blue Bear Cafe to a downtown location if one can be found under the right circumstances.

City Honors

The whiff of Blue Bear Cafe’s success wafted from City Hall a few miles away, as evidenced by the special recognition it received at a recent meeting of the Mount Airy Board of Commissioners.

Pyles attended this session with two students, Griffin and fellow junior Shatavia Robison, who were there for a presentation on the program highlighted by the girls handing out chocolate chip cookies to those in attendance.

The cookies were contained in colorful wrappers with labels touting sentiments such as “be kind” and “choose happiness”.

“This program is all about our kids first and foremost,” Pyles said of the effort that “just blew my mind.”

“The Blue Bear Cafe is one of the shining lights of the Mount Airy school system,” remarked Commissioner Jon Cawley, while thanking Polly Long for her involvement.

“I know you will go far in life,” Commissioner Marie Wood told the students.

“Great job, ladies,” said Joe Zalescik of the board.

“That’s what a community like Mount Airy is and can be,” Mayor Ron Niland said of the cafe’s success.

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